Dealers and collectors bid a soggy farewell to 2011’s Brimfield antiques show season

Brimfield-September-Mays-Antiques

Weather again menaced Brimfield for this season’s final gathering September 6-11, 2011 with rain Tuesday and a storm Wednesday overnight called the hundred year rainfall by the weather reporters on TV and radio. The rain was so severe it saturated the field at Mays Antiques Market preventing dealers from driving onto the grounds for Thursday’s opening. The show did eventually open Friday with about half the dealers who were still in town ready to show and sell. Read More +

Debt crisis does nothing to slow down New Orleans auction action

In the midst of the government’s debt crisis deliberations, New Orleans Auction Galleries hosted one ofits most successful sales to date July 30-31, 2011, showing signs of strength in the luxury and auction markets. An elaborate Chinese carved coral group brought $67,650, far surpassing the pre-auction estimate of $3,000 to $5,000. Other notable sales in the category included a colorful Chinese Famille Rose porcelain plaque set in a custom wooden frame and stand hammered for an astounding $67,650, and a Mughal-style jade handled dagger which sold for $34,440 following ten minutes of bidding.
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More than 500 rare and vintage clocks and assorted memorabilia offered with no reserve

An antique discovery clock auction, Aug. 27, 2011 is loaded with more than 500 rare and vintage clocks from a single-owner collection. Included in the sale are American large wall clocks and case clocks, grandfather clocks and examples from England, France and Germany. This more than just a clock action. Tucked inside the sale are pendulums, weights, watchmakers’ benches and multi-drawer cabinets, watch and clock ephemera and advertising signs.
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Former FBI agent turned author Robert Wittman’s first-ever art crime seminar a ‘hit’ with attendees

Former FBI agent and author Robert Wittman’s first-ever seminar June 13, 2011 on how the art business can protect itself against the growing threat of art crime attracted 13 attendees, including Antique Trader columnist Caroline Ashleigh. The week, consisting of five days of instruction and discussion with field experts, was a one-of-a-kind seminar in which each participant personally interacted with the material and presenters. The result was a seminar described by participants as unmatched in quality of topics, expert presentations, and atmosphere.
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Louis XVI bedroom suite brings $72,000 in California antique furniture auction

At a time when furniture is down in most circles, a June 14 auction in Los Angeles delivered what bidders wanted in their antique furniture: quality, variety and provenance. A Louis XVI style gilt bronze mounted mahogany suite of bedroom furniture, dating to the late 19th century, sold for $73,200 and a ; a Louis XVI style gilt bronze mounted marquetry bois satine and George III mahogany secretary bookcase from the estate of director, writer, producer and actor, Tim Whelan and his wife, actress and Los Angeles interior decorator, Miriam Seegar, sold for $30,500.
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Furniture Detective: Don’t underestimate sandpaper’s ability to close wood pores and even grain color

Furniture Detective Fred Taylor asks after a piece of antique furniture is stripped, what happens next? The purist will say to finish it in some exotic concoction of wax and oil and leave it alone. The hack next door will recommend three coats of tinted gloss polyurethane rubbed between coats with fine steel wool. The professional will say: "Sand it first." Sand it? Why in the world would you sand it? Because preparation is 90 percent of finishing, and the best finish in the world won’t look good if the piece isn’t properly prepared for the finish. So what exactly is the objective of the sanding process?
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