Condition issues mean bed is better off as a bench

Q I know this may be a long shot to ask you and sorry to bother you. I have my great grandmothers bed and it’s in really rough shape. So I’m restoring it into a bench for my mom (her granddaughter) I came across a couple markings but can’t find out any info. Thought maybe you could help. Thank you in advance if it’s possible and I also understand if that’s not something you are interested in. Here are a couple pictures.
— B.H., via email 

Determining Age of Classic Bed

A Yours is classic for mass produced furniture seen in this country during the early years of the twentieth century; it appears to be a full-size or three-quarter size bed. Many beds made during that time period were three-quarter size. A double-size bed measures 54” X 74” inches while a three-quarter-size bed measures 48” X 75”. To determine this you take a measure from the inside of the side rails. Three-quarter size beds are typically from the early twentieth century and should not be confused with an antique bed or a bed from before the year 1900.

While antique beds are usually also 48” wide they are three inches shorter than three-quarter size beds. Bedding for three-quarter size beds can be difficult to find today. I have had many of these beds in the past complete with the iron spring and have used a double mattress on them without a problem. However, if you love a three-quarter inch bed and using a double mattress just doesn’t sit well with you, there are places that still make three-quarter size mattresses – mattressinsider.com is one of them.

Marking on Logo May Not Always Represent Maker

Your bed is a product of the New York Furniture Company, which had a number of stores in several different states including: New York, Connecticut, Virginia, and Colorado during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I can find no record of the company after that time. Perhaps the “adc” logo on the bed referred to a local furniture store that sold products constructed at the New York Furniture Co. It was not uncommon for retailers to add their name to furniture, china and even flatware that was made by larger companies.

I’m not a big fan of destroying old furniture, however, your bed is in rough shape and not worth major refinishing, and your plan for repurposing it as a bench will give it another calling and save it from complete destruction. The headboard will make a beautiful bench and the bow footboard is fancy enough to make a second bench. It’s a wonderful idea, a very thoughtful gift for your mom, and a “new” family heirloom.
— Dr. Anthony J. Cavo

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