Jenkins Shows draws 20,000 for Springfield Extravaganza

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Munday and Munday of Benton, Ill., is a mother-daughter team that emphasizes early earthenware and holiday decorations. Photos by Tom O'Hara.

 

SPRINGFIELD, Ohio – Jenkins Shows gathered more than 2,400 exhibitors Sept. 18-20 at Clarke County fairgrounds for their Springfield Antiques Show and Flea Market Extravaganza. “Every month except July we have a show here but the biggest are the May and September Extravaganzas” according to Jon Jenkins, the company spokesman. For this latest affair Jenkins said the attendance was the highest ever in all the years they have been running the affair. He was pleasantly surprised for he said September is usually slightly less in dealers and customers than May.

Dealers were for the most part pleased with their results as well. Sherry Spehar said, “This was my best show ever,” selling little antiques and collectibles. The Michigan dealer felt she was so successful on Friday and Saturday she wanted to spend Sunday shopping other exhibitors show stock to add more inventory to her own collection.

Springfield started on Thursday with dealers lining up for the entry that afternoon and also Friday morning. The procedure is that for about 800 dealers in the buildings, set up is Thursday afternoon until four. After that, when their vehicles have cleared out from the buildings, the outside dealers enter their spaces. This creates a great deal of activity selling amongst them.

Friday morning at six the customers are admitted to the grounds to begin their searches. This exposition is so vast it takes more than one day to peruse all the exhibits for just the right stuff! Shoppers generally have a system; some spend the first two hours searching the fields for their favorite dealers, waiting for the buildings to open at 9 a.m. To others, it is all in the outlying areas, where the antiques and collectibles are just pulled off the trucks, vans and trailers and spread out on the ground for inspection. In any case the shopping was intense, with discoveries all weekend long.

There was the trotting horse weather vane on its original iron arrow, found Sunday morning for only a few hundred dollars; a small 200 year old painted work table went to a new home from a Saturday purchase.

Sue Gipe a dealer from Covington, Ohio, was offering an early Virginia pie safe for under $1,000, with minor repairs. Mario Pollo, Woodstock, N.Y., was offering several painted pieces including a yellow and brown grain painted jelly cupboard which was sold to another exhibiting dealer.

Toys were offered by Sharon and Russ Whitmore, Nashville, Ind. including a large assortment of key wind pieces. Two of the key winders included a chicken and a duck which would flap their wings and walk around. They were priced at $450 each. 

Springfield Antiques Show and Flea Market is on the third weekend of every month except June, when it is the fourth, and no show in July. In the fall months, one of the buildings has a show in the show, with walled booths in the Youth Building for antiques only, no flea market there.

More information is available from Web site, www.springfieldantiqueshow.com or call them at 937-325-0053. The site has links to the other Jenkins Shows including Music Valley Antiques Show and Tailgate Antiques Show in Nashville Oct. 29-31, 2009.

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Early Americana selections from Sue Gipe, Covington, Ohio.
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Toys and other early collectibles were offered by Sharon and Russ Whitmore, exhibitors from Nashville, Ind.

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