Winter Antiques Show celebrates 55th year with exhibit from Corning Museum of Glass

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From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.

The Winter Antiques Show celebrates its 55th year as America’s most prestigious antiques show, providing museums, established collectors, dealers, design professionals and first-time buyers with opportunities to see and purchase exceptional pieces showcased by 75 exhibitors.

This year, new specialists in 20th century Scandinavian furniture, American and European 20th century decorative arts, Americana, photography and porcelain join this fully vetted show, which will be held Jan. 23-Feb. 1, 2009. From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity. All net proceeds from sponsors, special events, and ticket sales support East Side House Settlement, a non-profit in the South Bronx providing social services to community residents.

The 2009 loan exhibition is from The Corning Museum of Glass in Corning, New York, home to the world’s most comprehensive collection of glass. More than fifty exceptional works will be displayed in The Fragile Art: Extraordinary Objects from The Corning Museum of Glass. The exhibition features works spanning four continents, more than three millennia, and the full range of artistic ingenuity and technical innovation in glass.

Highlights include an ancient Roman serving dish cover in the form of a fish, a glass allegory depicting Marie Antoinette lamenting the demise of the aristocracy during the French Revolution, a covered tumbler that is one of the earliest known dated pieces of American glass, and a 1930s illuminated glass radiator. The loan exhibition, designed by Vignelli Associates, is sponsored by Chubb Personal Insurance for the 13th consecutive year. Many of the exhibitors in this year’s Show, including Alexander Gallery, Geoffrey Diner Gallery, Hirschl & Adler Galleries, Macklowe Gallery, Safani, and James Robinson are featuring glass in their booths to complement the loan exhibition.

New Exhibitors:

Antik: New York based Antik specializes in early 20th century works by artists and architects designing at the forefront of the modernist movement in Scandinavia. Antik focuses on the studio ceramics from this period, exemplified by such masters as Berndt Friberg (Gustavsberg) and Axel Salto (Royal Copenhagen), whose work will be featured in this year’s Show. Antik also will exhibit handcrafted furniture from architects of the Danish Cabinetmaker Guild and the Swedish Functionalist movement.
Cohen & Cohen: Established in London in 1973 as an expert in Chinese export porcelain, Cohen & Cohen now holds one of the finest inventories of its kind in the world. Cohen & Cohen’s booth will feature key pieces from its catalogue Tiptoe Through the Tulipieres and a group of porcelain birds from the renowned James E. Sowell Collection.

Bernard Goldberg Fine Arts: Specializing in American art from 1900 to 1950 including paintings, sculpture, works on paper, and decorative arts, Bernard Goldberg Fine Arts will show Arts and Crafts furniture by Gustav Stickley and complementary paintings and works on paper by Edward Steichen, Arthur Wesley Dow, and Thomas Wilmer Dewing. Stickley highlights include an exceptionally rare 1904 chandelier with a mica shade, a 1905 drop-leaf desk, and a 1902 tea table with Grueby tiles.  Also featured will be a rare, early (1907) Tonalist painting,  Moonlit Landscape by Steichen.

Hans P. Kraus, Jr., Fine Photographs: Focusing on 19th and early 20th century photographs, and in particular, works before 1860, Kraus will recreate the interior of Alfred Stieglitz’s and Edward Steichen’s  "291" gallery. Inspired by the ideas of the Arts and Crafts and Symbolist movements in Europe, the booth will feature Pictoralist photography by Steichen, Stieglitz, Julia Margaret Cameron, and Hill and Adamson, among others. The installation includes recreations of the lighting figures and burlap walls that match the color scheme of the original gallery. 

Nathan Liverant and Son: The owner, Arthur Liverant, is a third generation antiques dealer, son of Zeke and grandson of Nathan, who founded the business more than 80 years ago. Nathan Liverant and Son has been actively dealing in 18th and 19th century American furniture, paintings, silver, glass, and related accessories since 1920. In addition to a large inventory of antiques, the firm focuses on fine examples of Connecticut and New England furniture made prior to 1840. 

For more information, call 718-292-7392 or visit www.winterantiquesshow.com.

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More Images:

featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.
featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.
featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.
featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.
featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.
featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.
featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.
featuredImage
From ancient Roman glass through Mid-Century Modern chairs, every object exhibited at the Winter Antiques Show is vetted for quality and authenticity.

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