5 blooming vintage botanical engravings

By Antoinette Rahn

Happy National Flower Day (Oct. 7). Blooming in gardens, pots, and parks, flowers are representative of many facets of life and science. The presence of flowers in relation to the day-to-day of humanity is evident in artifacts dating to the paleolithic age, according to information found at www.theflowerexpert.com.

Scientific, Historic & Artistic

It’s also reported that within the 21st century more than 270,000 species of flowers have been documented, including through botanical prints, according to www.theflowerexpert.com. Below are five botanical prints that changed hands at auction. They representative of the popularity of flowers in art. This interest dates back to the 17th century.

Thomaston Auction Galleries

Hand-colored engraving of the double cinnamon rose by J.M. Seligmann and A.L. Wirsing from the mid-18th century, sold as part of a lot of 15 botanical prints presented at auction by Thomaston Place Auction Galleries in 2014. The lot sold for $2,750.

Clars Auction Gallery

Engravings Capture Beauty of Botany

Lot of 12 botanical prints, hand colored, by Johann Wilhelm Weinmann, early 18th century, realized $2,250 during an auction in 2016 presented by Clars Auction Gallery.

Susanin’s

Trio of botanical engravings, hand colored, created by Basilius Besler in the 17th century, commanded $950 during Susanin’s Auctions’ April 2013 sale.

Heritage Auctions

Bundles of Botanical Engravings 

Group of eight English botanical engravings after the style of Robert Sweet, done by S. Watts in the 19th century, realized $650 during Heritage Auctions’ June 2011 auction.

Hand-colored engraving from the first folio edition of “The Temple of Flora” by Robert John Thornton, circa 1799, sold for $500 during a November 2015 auction.

Here’s to appreciating the beauty of blooming flowers in as many ways as possible.

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