Beet-form sugar shaker knocks down $3,335 in special sale

 

MT. CRAWFORD, Va. — Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates July 27, 2013, auction of Salt, Pepper and Sugar Shakers was held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Glass Salt and Sugar Shaker Collectors held in nearby Harrisonburg, Va. The sale realized $192,246, with nearly 1,100 registered bidders from 18 countries.

The top lot of the day was a 3 7/8-inch high Mt. Washington Glass Company fig or beet sugar shaker, in cased cranberry with polychrome floral decoration, dating to the fourth quarter of the 19th century. The shaker was in remarkable condition, and came from the

Mt. Washington beet shaker

Mt. Washington Glass Company fig or beet sugar shaker, in cased cranberry with polychrome floral decoration, dating to the fourth quarter of the 19th century. 3 7/8″ HOA, the shaker was in remarkable condition, and sold for $3, 335 against the $1-2,000 estimate. (Photo courtesy Jeffrey S. Evans Assoc)

collection of the late Richard “Dick” and Mary Ann Krauss of Clyde, Ohio. It sold for $3,335. (All prices realized include 15 percent buyer’s premium.)

A 5 3/8-inch high Findlay onyx sugar shaker in deep butterscotch with amber flowers, neck ribs with alternating light rose and ivory columns, with a period lid also performed well. The circa 1889 shaker, made by Dalzell, Gilmore & Leighton Co., of Findlay, Ohio, sold for $2,990.

The most expensive salt and pepper shakers ended up being a set of 3 1/8-inch tall hexagonal-form, blue Aurene shakers with non-matching sterling period lids, attributed to Steuben Glass Works (1912-1922). The set was published in Lechner’s “The World of Salt Shakers II,” (p. 18, bottom left and p. 182, bottom right). From the collection of the late Richard “Dick” and Mary Ann Krauss of Clyde, Ohio, the pair were estimated to sell for $500 to $800, but realized $2,760.

Also of note, a circa 1892 3 1/4-inch tall figural Isabella salt shaker in opaque Nile green, with embossed base (“ISABELLA”) attributed to The Novelty Glass Co. of Fostoria, Ohio, earned $1,495.

After the auction, Jeffrey S. Evans said, “The AGSSSC convention drew over 50 members

Blue Aurene salt and pepper shakers, of hexagonal form, with non-matching sterling period lid, attributed to Steuben Glass Works,  1912-1922 measuring 3 1/8" HOA, estimated to sell for $500-800, they realized $2,760. (Photo courtesy Jeffrey S. Evans & Assoc)

Blue Aurene salt and pepper shakers, of hexagonal form, with non-matching sterling period lid, attributed to Steuben Glass Works, 1912-1922 measuring 3 1/8″ HOA, estimated to sell for $500-800, they realized $2,760. (Photo courtesy Jeffrey S. Evans & Assoc)

from all corners of the U.S., from Maine to Florida to California. The club and the auction were covered in the New York Times. Rare and unusual examples brought good prices with several shakers reaching new record high prices. Middle market shakers were soft. The groups of lower-end shakers sold surprisingly-well to on-line bidders, suggesting that some new collectors have entered the field.”

The next auction at Jeffrey S. Evans & Associates, taking place Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013, is a cataloged sale of early American pattern glass and other 19th century glass.

For more information, visit www.jeffreysevans.com or contact info@jeffreysevans.com or 540-434-3939.

Leave a Reply