Collect.com’s first all-jewelry auction

Coming in October, jewelry to suit every pocketbook, just in time for holiday gift giving.


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Pearl expert Eve Alfillé's Last Year at Marienbad necklace, multiple strands of keshi pearls held by unusual 18 karat gold and 18 karat white gold clasp, displaying the designer's "jet d'eau" element with 14 diamonds. Photo courtesy Matthew Arden, EveJewelry.com

Antique Trader jewelry columnist and Krause Books author Kathy Flood is heading up the first all-jewelry auction for Collect.com Auctions. With bidding beginning in October, collectors will be able to find the perfect holiday gifts for any women (or men) in their lives.

Some lots will have a distinct “crossover collectibles” theme, ideal for hobbyists who like to keep purchases close to home such as music, Beatles, hunting, fishing, quilting, art, shoes, guns, coins, Disneyana, Hummels and Orientalia. Other lots will include jewelry simply for investment, fashion, or enjoyment.

Asked for some early consignments she’s most excited about, Flood said, “Judging from the reaction to the chapter on jadeite in the new Warman’s Jewelry 4th edition, I’d have to say we’re thrilled to have gotten a consignment for a collection of Burmese jadeite jewelry. The twin to one of the necklaces sold elsewhere for $250,000, so connoisseurs of old-stock gem jade will have a rare opportunity to pick up some incredible jewelry for investment and style. Another necklace, of carved lavender-jade beads, is appraised at $5,000, but will open at $1,688, a number meaningful to the Chinese, signifying lasting wealth. The great thing for bidders is they can rely completely on the provenance of this jadeite. It’s ‘A’ jade from Burma, consigned by a family of long-time collectors.

“While this family values jadeite for its beauty and unique place in Chinese society, they manage to make it all a lot of fun, too. The mother and daughter pair it with costume jewelry from Kenneth Jay Lane and Hattie Carnegie, and with Deco designs from Chanel and Cartier. The family has a mission: They hope to get the message out to Americans that jade is fresh and fun rather than staid and old-fashioned. The way they put it together with other jewelry makes it look so high fashion, and at the same time, we’re talking about investment pieces.”

Flood also wanted to pull some examples into the auction from the Warman’s Jewelry book. “For instance,” she says,  “we’ll have Eve Alfillé’s gorgeous necklace of keshi pearls with gold-and-diamonds clasp, called Last Night at Marienbad, from the Eve Alfillé Gallery collection. It’s stunning, and something any woman who wants one great pearl necklace would flip over if she received it as a gift.” 

Victorian specialist Linda Lombardo (from Worn to Perfection on RubyLane.com) is consigning jewelry to the auction, including a piece from Warman’s Jewelry – the large 1900 sash pin with huge red faceted glass centerpiece.

“Antique Victorian jewelry is such a romantic gift, so much sentiment surrounding it and always reminding the recipient of Victoria’s great, undying love for Albert.”

In the upcoming Warman’s Jewelry Field Guide 2nd edition, Flood features an incredible couture selection from Hanna Bernhard Paris. “I’m happy to say Nathalie Bernhard has consigned their signature ‘emblem’ or logo piece, an enormous jeweled flamingo necklace that’s to cry for. The 6-inch pink bird head detaches to become a statement brooch,” Flood says. 

For vintage Bakelite collectors, as well as fans of rare Disneyana, the auction is to feature a scarce, 1941 Pinocchio pin, old Bakelite with painted accents, all on wood to heighten the “puppet” effect. “He’s articulated, and hangs from a carved crossbar. He’s huge, and I checked with a number of Bakelite specialists who had never found him or seen him before. The original paint on the Bakelite brooch is brilliant, communicating that expression of fear the boy has looking back over his shoulder, fleeing the bullies chasing him. What a dream piece for a Disney or Bakelite collector,” Flood said. Additional Bakelite jewelry is to be sold as well.
Flood  will consign a portion of her famous Christmas jewelry collection, including a rare Navajo silver design.

“Collect.com bidders will see fantastic holiday arbors, including some rare Yuletide tannenbaum. It’s a special chance to start a terrific holiday tradition: buying an annual Christmas tree brooch for mothers, daughters, sisters, girlfriends, grandmothers, wives – or the male equivalent of those relationships, because many men passionately collect Christmas tree pins.”

Asked if she has any particular goals for this first-ever auction, Flood had a simple reply: “My goal is to avoid having even a single dull lot. Whether it’s a group of novelty pins or a string of pearls, I don’t want any lot to be a bore. I really believe there’ll be something intriguing here for everyone, whether you have lots of discretionary income to spend or almost none; whether you’re brand new to jewelry or a long-time collector.

To learn about the October jewelry sale among others visit Collect.com/Auctions or call 888-463-3063.  ?



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More Images:

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Vintage 1941 Pinocchio puppet pin, Bakelite on wood, articulated carving set as pendant hanging from crossbar, 3-3/4 inches. Photo courtesy Kathy Flood
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Hanna Bernhard pink flamingo necklace and brooch combo, vintage Swarovski stones in 6-inch pin, semi-precious stones necklace, signed Hanna Bernhard Paris.
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Rare Southwestern Navajo sterling Christmas tree pin-pendant with turquoise, onyx, carnelian stones prong set into metal, 2-7/8 inches, signed by Navajo artist F.M. Begay.

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