Live to learn and learn to live via antiques and collectibles

One of the most inspiring, creative and caring teachers I’ve ever known used to urge my grade-school classmates and I to: live to learn and learn to live. It took a little explanation on her part for everyone in our sixth grade class to remotely understand that phrase. However, more than 30 years later it’s still in my brain.

Living and Learning Go Hand-in-Hand With Collecting

Antiques Roadshow appraisal center

A bustle of activity during the Antiques Roadshow tour stop in Green Bay, Wis. in June of 2017. The line for appraisal of Fine Art, Paintings and Drawings was among the busiest. (Photo by Karen Knapstein)

That’s the memory that flashed across my mind as Karen (Knapstein) and I  were putting this issue (July 19, 2017) together. I could say it was our intention to introduce you to people who live to learn and learn to live. However, I think that is a result of sharing the stories and insights of people. The people who are passionate about what they do. As well as those who are share stories about items the adore. Not to mention the experiences they are grateful to have had.

We were able to incorporate a few special elements, as I’m sure you noticed as soon as you saw the cover – and the bulk – of this edition. We wanted to give you a nice hearty selection of articles to read. In addition to various topics to learn more about, and some fascinating people to ‘get to know.’

Delving Into Antiques Roadshow, Studio Jewelry and ‘Tiffany Girls’ 

I think you’ll find many of the people in this issue truly live to learn and learn to live. The list includes, but is definitely not limited to Elmer & Bernadette Duellman, Antiques Roadshow staff, volunteers, appraisers, and attendees of the Green Bay, Wis. tour stop, Clara Driscoll and her team of “Tiffany Girls,” Mike Cramer, as well as four prolific studio jewelry artists. Plus, we mustn’t forget the businesses appearing in our antiques and collectibles trade directory.

I’d also like to congratulate Mary Sweeney and Kimberly Zomok. They are the winners of the Trader ‘Late Spring Trivia Contest’. Each will receive an Antique Trader tote bag containing a copy of Warman’s Antiques & Collectibles 2018 and their choice of one of three other books. Thank you to everyone who participated in this contest, and please look for more contests in the future.

Items of Note

Another special feature in this issue is the 2017 business trade directory. Even if you weren’t aware

July 19, 2017 cover

The July 19, 2017 digital edition of Antique Trader is available for purchase now. The price for print or digital is $2. Digital versions are available at KrauseBooks.com. For a print copy of this issue, please email toni.rahn@fwmedia.com.

or couldn’t participate this year, don’t worry. Feel free to submit your information now and we’ll include it in the online presentation of the directory. Plus, we’ll keep it on file to be featured in the 2018 print directory.

Also, looking ahead to our annual contest that focuses on you, the readers, we will once again host a Nostalgic Treasures contest in November. Following last year’s contest/issue, we received a tremendous amount of feedback from many of you saying you prefer a contest based on the story associated with an item, and not solely about value or rarity. We are glad to hear you like the nostalgic approach, as we do, too. Plus, during our recent conversation with Marsha Bemko, executive producer of Antiques Roadshow, her belief that “the story is king,” reaffirmed our conviction that your tales of Nostalgic Treasures is the way to go. That’s not to say in the future the scope of the contest/issue might not change, but for now, let’s celebrate your nostalgic stories.

COMMENT