Jan. 28 auction kicks off new format at J. Levine Auction

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (January 20, 2016) – One of the Southwest’s largest auction houses,

Miller Eames chair

1960s Herman Miller Eames Lounge Chair & Ottoman. (All photos courtesy J. Levine Auctioneers)

Scottsdale-based J. Levine Auction & Appraisal, is starting the new year with a change of format from weekly to monthly three-day auctions.

The January event kicks off Wednesday, January 27, with a special preview reception from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and will feature complimentary appetizers and cocktails at the upscale auction house, which is located at 10345 N. Scottsdale Rd., in Scottsdale, on the southeast corner of Scottsdale Road and Shea Boulevard. Admission is free, but reservations are requested by calling (480) 496-2212.

The next three days feature luxury items from affluent estates with rare antiques and collectibles auctioned on Thursday, January 28, notable paintings, sculpture and other fine art on Friday, January 29, and estate jewelry, small collectibles, and an extensive collection of Oriental, Turkish, Persian, Native American, and other fine rugs on Saturday, January 30. Doors open each morning at 9 a.m. and the auctions start at 11 a.m. The auction house will also be open on Wed., January 27 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. for a free preview.

“We’re pleased to have grown to the level where we can now conduct larger, monthly auctions,” said Josh Levine, auctioneer and owner of J. Levine Auction & Appraisal. “We’ll conduct three-day auctions at the end of every month, and I think the bidders will appreciate the new format and diverse selection.”

Levine will be flying in celebrity auctioneer and TV reporter Lindsey Alexa Gundersen from London to help bid call on Friday and Saturday, January 29 and January 30. Gundersen will also bid call during the special “Fostering Hope: A Fine Wine Auction” on the evening of Saturday, Feb. 13. The wine auction features more than 200 individual bottles and vertical collections of classic and vintage wine from one consignor. A portion of proceeds from the wine auction will benefit OCJ Foster Kids (Opportunity, Community & Justice for Kids).

Items expected to cause a bidding frenzy in the January auctions include:

Thursday, January 28 (Rare Antiques & Collectibles)

• Engraved Colt 1860 Army Percussion Revolver with case. Estimated to be worth between $8,000 and $12,000. This rare relic should do well because of its age, design and how well preserved it is.

• 1960s Herman Miller Eames Lounge Chair & Ottoman. Leather and wood. Estimated to be worth

rug

Kashan wool rug, second half of 20th century.

between $2,000 and $4,000. Mid-modern furniture is hot right now, especially designs by Herman Miller.

• 97-Piece The Stieff Co. Sterling Silver Flatware. Design: Homewood circa 1938. Estimated to be worth between $1,500 and $2,000. The famed Baltimore-based sterling silver manufacturing company named this pattern after the colonial home “Homewood,” which was built by Charles Carroll, who, at the time, was the last survivor of the 57 signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Friday, January 29 (Fine Art)

• Kenneth Noland (1924-2010) Acrylic on Canvas. Title: “Replace!”; Dated 1980 on back; estate had 1990 cocktail reception poster when purchased. Estimated to be worth between $100,000 and $150,000.

• Jules Olitski (1922-2007) “Facer” Acrylic Painting. Estimated to be worth between $10,000 and $15,000.

• Rudolf Andree (1887-1970) Venice Harbor Scene. Oil painting on canvas. Year or Era Produced: 20th Century. Estimated to be worth between $1,000 and $3,000.

Saturday, January 30 (Estate Jewelry, Fine Rugs, Small Collectibles)

• Signed Shadsar Family Kashan Wool Rug. Dates back to the second half of the 20th century. Estimated to be worth between $4,000 and $8,000. Kashan is a famous oasis in Iran and the Shadsar family of master weavers has been making rugs for more than a century.

• 18K White Gold Orianne Tanzanite Diamond Ring featuring one radiant Tanzanite stone and 76 round brilliant cut diamonds. Estimated to be worth between $2,000 and $5,000. Tanzanite rivals rubies, emeralds and sapphires in its rarity and popularity.

• “Four-in-One” Rug attributed to Navajo Weaver Mary Long. Estimated to be worth between $2,000 and $4,000. Long was an award-winning master weaver who came from a talented family of weavers. Her rugs continue to command high prices at auction.

The public can bid live during the events at J. Levine Auction & Appraisal, online, or via phone. For information, visit www.jlevines.com or call (480) 496-2212.

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