More than 100 new discoveries revealed at Stretch Glass convo

MARIETTA, Ohio — Vintage stretch glass was produced by several American glass companies circa 1916-1932. Stretch glass begins as molded glass, is then iridized, reheated and finished by skilled artisans who often reshaped the glass. Producers of stretch glass sometimes created various sizes of items to appeal to different buyers. For example, certain candlestick shapes were available in 8-inch, 10-inch and even 12-inch heights. Bowls and comports were often reshaped into a variety of finished products in a wide range of shapes and sizes.

Three glass toothpick holders, identical in shape and size, in topaz, blue and crystal stretch glass, believed to have been made by US Glass. (Photo courtesy Stretch Glass Society)

Three glass toothpick holders, identical in shape and size, in topaz, blue and crystal stretch glass, believed to have been made by US Glass. (Photo courtesy Stretch Glass Society)

Stretch glass has been a recognized collectible since the Stretch Glass Society was formed in the 1970s. There are more than 800 examples, sizes and shapes of vintage iridescent stretch glass documented in 20-plus reference books and price guides. Yet, at the Society’s 2012 Annual Convention, Show and Sale, more than 100 previously undocumented examples of vintage iridescent stretch glass were revealed and displayed publicly. The examples included entirely “new” discoveries, previously undocumented shapes and items made from previously known molds, but never seen with stretch effect. There were also “super” sizes of comports, vases and other items, previously known only in smaller sizes. The items displayed, significantly expand the known colors, shapes and sizes of vintage stretch glass and represent major discoveries for enthusiasts and collectors.

Highlighting the exhibit were more than 30 completely new items which include:

  • Two Fenton “Melon Rib” lamps (in Velva rose and Florentine green).
  • Three toothpicks, identical in shape and size, in Topaz, Blue and Crystal stretch glass, believed to have been made by US Glass.
  • Fenton Tangerine sherbet dish with paneled sides and a hexagon foot.

    Fenton #857 fan vase lamp in Velva Rose. Fan vase has a punched hole for the fixture made at the mold time, rather than a later drilled hole. (Photo courtesy Stretch Glass Society)

    Fenton #857 fan vase lamp in Velva Rose. Fan vase has a punched hole for the fixture made at the mold time, rather than a later drilled hole. (Photo courtesy Stretch Glass Society)

  •  Small Jade Green sherbet not previously known in this shape.
  • Individual Topaz fruit bowl with a scalloped edge and external panels, believed to part of a berry set. However, the matching master bowl has not yet been found nor has the manufacturer been positively identified.
  • Two spittoon-shaped bowls, one in Celeste Blue and a taller one in Persian Pearl made from Fenton’s #109 mold.

A Fenton Celeste Blue Diamond Optic Interior cologne complete with matching stopper. While there is an early Fenton catalog page which shows this as part of a set (two colognes, a jar and rectangular tray), all other known examples do not have the stretch iridescence. The cologne is complete with the original Fenton Art Glass Company paper label on the base.

The Stretch Glass Society’s 39th Annual Convention, Show and Sale will be held July 24-26, 2013, at the Comfort Inn in Marietta, Ohio. Photographs of the 2012 Club Display, as well as past displays, and many of the previously unlisted items are on the Stretch Glass Society’s website, www.stretchglasssociety.org. The Society provides free identification of stretch glass via email and welcomes all who are interested in learning about and collecting contemporary and vintage stretch glass to join the SGS. Find out more at www.stretchglasssociety.org or by contacting info@stretchglasssociety.org or writing to The Stretch Glass Society, P.O. Box 117, Sunbury, OH 43074.

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