Online auction sets record with first fine art sale

BERLIN —Internet only art and auction house Auctionata saw record-setting sales during its July 21 Paintings, Paper Works and Sculptures auction – the auction houses’ first ever fine art auction.

Egon Schiele’s 19th century watercolor “Reclining Woman” sold for a record-breaking $2.42 million (including buyer’s premium) to lead all lots during the event, which was the ninth live sale and first devoted solely to fine arts hosted by the Berlin-based online auction

"Reclining Woman" is executed in gouache, watercolor and pencil on cream wove paper, circa 1916, measuring 18 7/8 inches wide by 12 1/2 tall, it is not laid down and shows no signs of prior restoration. It claimed top lot spot, selling for $2.42 million June 21 at Auctionata. (Photo courtesy Auctionata)

“Reclining Woman” is executed in gouache, watercolor and pencil on cream wove paper, circa 1916, measuring 18 7/8 inches wide by 12 1/2 tall, it is not laid down and shows no signs of prior restoration. It claimed top lot spot, selling for $2.42 million June 21 at Auctionata. (Photo courtesy Auctionata)

company. This sale of the “Reclining Woman” painting has thus outdone the previous chart topper, a painting from Andy Warhol’s “Flowers” series that had been auctioned online for US$1.3 million (then €910,000) on Artnet in July 2011.

Additional high points in the unprecedented auction of 100 lots included:

• Carl Moll’s “Villa in Vienna” which began at $45,000 and finished at $393,255

• Gottfried Helnwein’s Untitled (Blue Madonna), 1998, began at $31,765 before climbing to $90,121 as the gavel fell.

Nearly 800 people from 46 countries participated in the auction.

“We are absolutely delighted about this record and the successful auction. It speaks volumes that the previous online record for fine arts has remained unbroken for almost exactly two years, as does the fact that we at Auctionata have broken that record from a standing start with our first auction devoted solely to fine arts,” said Alexander Zacke, CEO of Auctionata.”Not only does our type of auction on the Internet represent the technological avant-garde – but it also fills the enormous gap that the key players have thus far been unable to close: transferring classic auctions onto the Internet in a way that enables everyone to experience the objects and the auctioneer as well as the bidding behaviour of other participants, all in real time.”

For more information about Auctionata or for a schedule of upcoming auctions visit www.auctionata.com.

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