Outdoor antiques will personalize your space

Outdoor antiques lend themselves to fall beauty

outdoor antiques iron urn and pedestal

Iron urn and pedestal from an English manor, circa 1890. Photo courtesy Chateau Domingue, Houston, Texas; chateaudomingue.com/

Here in the Midwest, fall brings cooler temperatures and beckoning blazes of color. It’s my favorite time of year for enjoying the outdoors and for traveling. Nowhere far, mind you; just traipsing around Wisconsin on the county and state roads before the snow flies. (Interstate highways are fine from getting from point A to point B, but not so great for sight-seeing.)

During these jaunts (and during my regular travels, really), whenever I see a nicely tended yard or garden I take a moment to appreciate it. I appreciate the time and work that goes into the upkeep. I respect the keepers’ dedication and I envy the designer’s vision. And I especially enjoy seeing outdoor antiques in yards and gardens. 

There are many properties in my area that come to mind – well-tended homesteads and farms (even a century-old church) where it’s obvious the owners and stewards take pride in what they have. They have each defined their spaces with what they find beautiful. In fact, in our agricultural area, it’s not uncommon to see old plows and other farm equipment retired to serving as yard sculptures.

Creating a unique, restive garden

outdoor antiques french fountain

French wall fountain of reclaimed stone elements, 19th century. “At the heart of any classic garden is the soothing splash of a stone fountain, an essential element found among Chateau Domingue’s garden collection.” Photo courtesy Chateau Domingue, Houston, Texas;
chateaudomingue.com/

Not all well-tended yards and gardens are equal, however. Each garden has its own feel; each garden has its own identity.

What really makes an outdoor living space really “pop” is some sort of man-made element. A weatherproof antique piece, such as a stone fountain or unique sculpture, makes a garden truly unique. A distinctive gate or pillars welcome visitors to the space beyond. Strategically placing an old, salvaged architectural element in an outdoor living space provides a focal point. It makes a yard or garden feel “complete.”

A few years ago, Antique Trader contributor Joe Truskot wrote an article about using antiques in outdoor living spaces. Truskot provides some helpful guidance about using antique and vintage elements to “mold our outdoor living space into a thing of beauty.” in his article, Truskot explores popular antique garden trends. He suggests many ways for using antiques in gardens.

After you read Truskot’s article, have a look around your yard or garden and see if there’s a place that would be improved by something old. If you find one, then the real fun begins – finding that special outdoor antique.

Chateau Domingue of Houston, Texas, offers one-of-a-kind selections of garden decor from France, Italy and Belgium that are ideal for for personalizing your outdoor living space. 

pool house from reclaimed architectural elements

Pool house of reclaimed architectural elements. Design by Pamela Pierce.
Photo courtesy Veranda Magazine

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