The-Map-Tooth

An exceptionally rare piece of scrimshaw widely referred to as “The Map Tooth” is one of only two known examples of scrimshaw to depict a finely rendered map or chart. (The other “Map Tooth” is in the New Bedford Whaling Museum Collection.) This 7.5” tooth depicts New Bedford Harbor, Buzzards Bay and the Elizabeth Islands on one side and a whaling scene on the other and sold for $168,000. Recent research concludes the tooth once belonged to Meylert Armstrong, a preeminent scrimshaw collector in the first half of the 19th century, before it was sold to E. Norman Flayderman and was illustrated in his seminal book, Scrimshaw and Scrimshanders, Whales and Whalemen.

An exceptionally rare piece of scrimshaw widely referred to as “The Map Tooth” is one of only two known examples of scrimshaw to depict a finely rendered map or chart. (The other “Map Tooth” is in the New Bedford Whaling Museum Collection.) This 7.5” tooth depicts New Bedford Harbor, Buzzards Bay and the Elizabeth Islands on one side and a whaling scene on the other and sold for $168,000. Recent research concludes the tooth once belonged to Meylert Armstrong, a preeminent scrimshaw collector in the first half of the 19th century, before it was sold to E. Norman Flayderman and was illustrated in his seminal book, Scrimshaw and Scrimshanders, Whales and Whalemen.

An exceptionally rare piece of scrimshaw widely referred to as “The Map Tooth” is one of only two known examples of scrimshaw to depict a finely rendered map or chart. (The other “Map Tooth” is in the New Bedford Whaling Museum Collection.) This 7.5” tooth depicts New Bedford Harbor, Buzzards Bay and the Elizabeth Islands on one side and a whaling scene on the other and sold for $168,000. Recent research concludes the tooth once belonged to Meylert Armstrong, a preeminent scrimshaw collector in the first half of the 19th century, before it was sold to E. Norman Flayderman and was illustrated in his seminal book, Scrimshaw and Scrimshanders, Whales and Whalemen.

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