Beth’s Treasure Part II

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George Anderson of Milton, Mass., with his mother Margaret Gordon Anderson. A dutiful son, George would send postcards to his mother from wherever the US Army sent him.

World War I postcard
The front of this card is not as interesting as the back. George went to a camp like this one for basic training before being sent to Europe.

World War I postcard
Like any young man away from home, George sometimes wrote, “Send money.”

World War I postcard
Some of the cards George sent home showed the places he stayed as a soldier, in this case, sleeping quarters in a stateside army barracks.


Since much of the war was fought in trenches, digging ditches was an unavoidable part of a soldier’s life.

World War I postcard
A postcard from Fort Dix, N.J., showing another unavoidable fact of life for the American soldier – marching.

World War I postcard
The colored tinting on the postcards at the time was still an inexact science, as these purple and mustard colored horses show.

World War I postcard
George’s first overseas assignment was at the American Red Cross Hospital in Paignton, England where he served as a records clerk.

World War I postcard
Military hospitals were sometimes set up on private estates, making the accommodations for the wounded a bit more luxurious than a typical army barracks.

World War I postcard
US soldiers could write to home without having to worry about postage – they simply wrote “Soldiers Mail” where the stamp would have gone. This card also bears a censor’s mark, verifying that it contained no classified information that might be dangerous if the card were to fall into enemy hands.

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More Images:

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While on a pass during his service in England, George ventured up to Scotland where his parents were from and sent this postcard back to his mother.
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Showing thistles, a view of the city of Aberdeen, and bearing the tartan of the Cameron clan, this card was sent by George to his parents, both of whom were Scottish immigrants to the US.

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