Beth’s Treasure Part III

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George managed to visit London before he was sent to France near the end of the war. This card shows Piccadilly circus, complete with an open topped, double decker bus.
World War I postcard
With the description written in both English and French, this shows the site of one of the most devastating battles of the war for the French army, with more than 40,000 French casualties in a single day.

World War I postcard
The site of the hotel in the French town of Chateau Thierry, showing the fountains and ruins. Because he was stationed in hospitals, George did not see any battles first hand, although he did visit Chateau Thierry and wrote, “It would take too much paper and energy to tell you about my trip, but will rattle it off to you when I am home.”

World War I postcard
The devastation at Chateau Thierry was a stark contrast to the luxurious surroundings of the hospital George worked at in Paignton.

World War I postcard
Not all US casualties died in battle. These are the graves near Chateau Thierry of American soldiers who died in the influenza pandemic that occurred just after the end of the war.

World War I postcard
A Salvation Army canteen where doughnuts were distributed to hungry soldiers at the front in France. According to some sources, the term “doughboy” comes from the word “doughnut.”

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More Images:

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Her majesty, Queen Mary. Among the things George saved was a letter from her husband George V - probably written by a secretary - thanking the American soldier for his help to England.
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Some of the postcards from France showed double images and were quite graphic; in this case, a "Decomposed Belgian" is shown and part of the Argonne Forest, which saw some of the heaviest fighting of the war.
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Some of the postcards from France had text written onto the plate before the image was reproduced, sometimes making them very difficult to read and causing some of the text to be lost.
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An early "Tank in Action" and a view of a train at night. The fact that the text was in English only shows that these cards from France were definitely intended for sale to foreigners.
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The top view shows the wreckage of an early plane, presumably shot down by American pilots, the body of its German crew on display in front of it. The bottom view shows German Kaiser Wilhelm II and his General, Erich von Ludendorff (with two F's - it's spelled incorrectly on the postcard). Chemin des Dames (which translates as "The Ladies' Path") was the site of one of the most devastating battles of the war for the French army.

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