Mary Manion

About Mary Manion

Mary Manion is associate director of Landmarks Gallery and Restoration Studio in Milwaukee, Wis. A columnist for Antique Trader since 2006, Manion is a member of the New England Appraisers Association.

Painter Fernand Leger and the logic of Modernism

Fernand Leger painting

Painter Fernand Leger made his mark alongside the first cubists – Picasso, Braque and Gris – in canvases that more or less banished nature from the scene. However, few Cubists pursued the logic of Modernism more aggressively than Leger. See why his works now sell for more than $13 million to art investors worldwide. Read More +

Vintage San Francisco rock concert posters remain a unique American art form

We Wilson rock concert poster

San Francisco in the ’60s brings thoughts of hippies and psychedelic rock, but the counterculture manifested itself in all the arts. Some of the rare 45 R.P.M. recordings from San Francisco bands have become valuable, but for collectors of the era’s artifacts, the greatest prizes are often original copies of the posters that promoted concerts in the Bay Area’s ballrooms and clubs. The best of those posters are magnificent examples of 20th century art and design and collectors are paying premium prices to own a slice of this era of American pop culture. Read More +

Today’s artists are still being inspired by Hugo Brehme photography

Taxco, Oro print Hugo Brehme photography

Mexican artists may have been introduced to modernity through photography, and one of the foremost Mexican photographers of the early 20th century, Hugo Brehme (1882-1954), has been cited as an influence on the country’s best known artist from the period, Diego Rivera. Brehme was a German immigrant imbued with the European Romantic tradition, which sought the sublime essence of nature and reveled in the beauty of ancient ruins. Read More +

The paintings of Red Arrow, Wisconsin’s Clarence Boyd Monegar, growing in popularity

IF

Artist Clarence Boyce Monegar is one of Wisconsin’s most beloved painters, executing landscape commissions for professionals and institutions. Monegar’s watercolors could often be found in doctor’s offices and bank lobbies. Since his death in 1968, his work has only increased in value and interest in his paintings has surfaced as far away as California. Read More +

Marc Chagall’s love affair with Paris

The Paris discovered by Marc Chagall (1887-1985) when he arrived by train in 1910 was still the city of the art world’s dreams. It was a metropolis of broad boulevards and crooked cobbled alleys lined with ateliers and cafes where Picasso might be found sitting with Braque. Chagall was able to subsist in a city where credit was extended to artists as a matter of course, where meals could sometimes be paid for in sketches and intellectuals could occupy a corner table for an entire afternoon of animated discussion for the price of a cup of coffee.
Read More +

Art Markets: Depicting industry in art defined the 20th century modernity

For the first half of the 20th century, images of industry were synonymous with progress. As assembly lines increasingly supplied the needs and wants of the world’s growing urban population, factory scenes became shorthand for the brave new world of modernity. Industrial art became an international genre, crossing political borders and economic systems alike. The scenes of laborers working within the shadows of enormous machines assumed similar form whether in the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany or the United States.
Read More +