Mitchell Museum focuses on Native American jewelry and beadwork

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Old Native Jewelry and Beadwork To Be Focus of Events April 25-26 at Mitchell Museum
 
EVANSTON, Ill. —  Special events for seasoned and novice collectors of old Native American jewelry and beadwork — and anyone curious about these genres  — are scheduled for Saturday, April 25,  and Sunday, April 26, at the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian, 3001 Central St., Evanston.

Tom and Deborah Begner, of Turkey Mountain Traders, Scottsdale, Ariz., will make presentations, conduct an informal appraisal session, and exhibit a diverse collection of items for sale. Ten percent of sales proceeds will benefit the nonprofit Mitchell Museum.

The Begners will give a presentation on “Antique Eastern Woodlands Beadwork” at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 25, focusing largely on beadwork made by members of the various Iroquois tribes from about 1800 to 1930.

At 2:15 p.m., they will offer informal identifications and appraisals of old Native American jewelry and Eastern beadwork brought in by the public.

They will speak on “The Top 10 Things to Look for in Old Indian Jewelry” at 3:15 p.m.

The Begners, who founded Turkey Mountain Traders 20 years ago, will stage an exhibition and sale of old jewelry and antique Eastern beadwork from 4-7 p.m. Items for sale include beadwork items priced from about $100 to $3,000, including beaded bags, souvenir “whimseys,” and hats from the late 1800s.  The jewelry is principally of Navajo and Zuni Pueblo origin, with items priced from $125. A noteworthy piece is a $12,000 Zuni fetish necklace made of shell and stone by the celebrated carver Leekya, who worked in the 1940s and 1950s.

Antique Indian beadwork and old jewelry also will be exhibited and sold from 1-4 p.m. on Sunday, April 26.
 
Admission to the events is included with museum admission. Admission is $5 for adults, $2.50 for seniors, students, teachers (with valid school ID), and children. Maximum suggested admission per family is $10. For information, phone (847) 475-1030. On the Net: www.mitchellmuseum.org.

Looks like an interesting opportunity …

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