‘Devil is in the details’ when it comes to Lalique art glass

DALLAS — When it comes to Lalique art glass, “similar” does not mean “the same.”

Inspired by Heritage Auctions’ upcoming Fine & Decorative Art sale, slated for June 15 and featuring Tiffany, Lalique and art glass, Nicholas Dawes, vice president of Special Collections for Heritage Auctions, shares a few observations on a common appraisal issue.

“It is a common opening in my email box: ‘I saw one just like it on Antiques Roadshow…’

Lalique frosted glass six tetes carafe fetched $8,125 at a recent Heritage Auctions sale. (Photo courtesy Heritage Auctions)

Lalique frosted glass six tetes carafe fetched $8,125 at a recent Heritage Auctions sale. (Photo courtesy Heritage Auctions)

The emailer is commonly disappointed,” said Dawes, who is the leading authority on Lalique glass and an expert appraiser on PBS’ “Antiques Roadshow” during all 16 seasons. In fact, something “just like it” may turn out to be quite different in value, as the following few examples illustrate:

• R. Lalique Amethyst Tinted Glass Victoire Mascot with Original Breves Illuminating Mount

A superb example of the Lalique automobile hood ornament ‘Victoire’, with the amethyst tint collector’s search for and complete with original illuminating mount (which is almost as rare as the ornament itself). Sold for $21,250.

• R. Lalique Clear and Frosted Glass Victoire Mascot

This is another example of the same ornament, in fine condition, but lacking the original mounting and without the amethyst tint that is evidence of long exposure to the sun. Sold for $16,250.

• R. Lalique Clear and Frosted Glass Six Tetes Carafe with Grey Patina

This is an especially rare and early Lalique decanter from circa 1914. Few of these have survived, and this one was in superb condition with original patina. Sold for $8,125.

Lalique clear glass Wingen decanter, sold for $813 at Heritage Auctions recently. (Photo courtesy Heritage Auctions)

Lalique clear glass Wingen decanter, sold for $813 at Heritage Auctions recently. (Photo courtesy Heritage Auctions)

• R. Lalique Clear Glass Wingen Decanter

Here is a perfectly fine and authentic Lalique decanter from 1926. By the mid-1920s, Lalique made large amounts of table glass, and decanters are not uncommon. Plainer

examples like this are bought more for use than collecting purposes. Sold for $813.

• R. Lalique Opalescent Yellow Glass Suzanne Statuette

A beautiful presentation of the Lalique statuette ‘Suzanne’ made in 1925 in rare, “butterscotch yellow” glass of unusually deep hue, generated lots of bidding. Sold for $23,750.

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