Nashville Glass Show focusing on Fostoria Crown Collection

NASHVILLE — A colorful glass display, seminars, and a building full of American-made glass and pottery will highlight the 14th Annual Elegant and Depression Glass Show and Sale in Nashville, Tenn., July 20-21 in the Exhibitor Building at the Tennessee State Fairgrounds. Hosted by the Fostoria Glass Society of Tennessee, a chapter of the Fostoria Glass Society of America, show hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $5 and is good for both days.

Anchor Hocking made FireKing jadite glassware in several different patterns are popular with collectors set to attend the Nashville glass show. (Photo courtesy Fostoria Glass Society)

Anchor Hocking made FireKing jadite glassware in several different patterns are popular with collectors set to attend the Nashville glass show. (Photo courtesy Fostoria Glass Society)

More than 20 nationally known dealers will fill the building with vintage glassware with an emphasis on elegant and depression glass of the 1920s and 1930s. Because the glassware was inexpensive, designs were often molded into the glassware to hide imperfections. Companies such as Jeanette, Hocking, Hazel-Atlas and Federal made depression glass in many different patterns and colors.

Elegant glass was made over a longer time span than depression glass, and it is generally of better quality. Intricate designs were often etched or cut into the glass. Manufacturers such as Cambridge, Fenton, Fostoria, Heisey, Tiffin, Imperial and Westmoreland made the glassware that is now classified as elegant. Because these manufacturers no longer exist, the only way to acquire American-made glassware today is at antique shops and glass shows.

Many of the dealers will also offer American-made pottery from companies that are also no longer in business. These companies include McCoy, Shawnee, Roseville, Watt and Weller.

The featured display pattern for this year’s show will be the Crown Collection produced by Fostoria Glass Company from 1961-1965. Designer George Sakier was responsible for the Crown pattern. The Crown Collection consisted of 10 different pieces in four patterns that were based on famous crown designs of Old World Europe. It was produced in crystal, royal blue, gold and ruby, and a complete collection in all patterns and colors consists of more than 50 pieces. After Fostoria Glass Co. closed in 1986, Indiana Glass Co. and Fenton Art Glass Co. produced some items using Crown moulds. The display will include several of these pieces to emphasize differences in the Fostoria items and those made by

Shelves of colorful depression glass are expected to line the booths during the Nashville glass show. (Photo courtesy Fostoria Glass Society)

Shelves of colorful depression glass are expected to line the booths during the Nashville glass show. (Photo courtesy Fostoria Glass Society)

other manufacturers.

The Crown Collection will also be the topic of a seminar at 1 p.m. on Saturday, led by Larry Duke, a Fostoria Glass Society of Tennessee (FGST) member and a collector of the Crown pattern.

A second seminar, set for 3 p.m. Saturday, will focus on The Elegant Years. Jack Peacock, a dealer from North Carolina who exhibits at many shows throughout the U.S., will discuss the characteristics and attributes of glassware classified as elegant.

A seminar scheduled for 1 p.m. Sunday will focus on Fostoria’s Brazilian pattern and advertising pieces in other patterns made by Fostoria Glass Co. The Brazilian pattern was made from 1898 to 1912 and includes many pieces that are typical of glassware production at that time. Harold Roth, a FGST member, will discuss how the pieces were originally used and how they may be repurposed for use today.

Proceeds from the show support the Fostoria Glass Museum in Moundsville, W.Va., and other organizations that preserve the history and artistry of American glassmakers. For more information, call 615-856-4259 or visit www.fostoria-tennessee.com or www.facebook.com/fostoriaglass.tn.

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