Unterberger’s ‘Canal in Venice’ may bring $250,000

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MILFORD, Conn. – Works from the Hudson River School are among the offerings at Shannon’s Fine Art Auctioneers Oct. 24, 2012. Also available are pieces from the Cape Ann School, American Impressionists, European and American Modern and Abstract artists, 19th century European artists, Orientalist artists and more. Among the listed artists are Franz R. Unterberger, Arthur Wesley Dow, Dale Nichols and David Johnson.

“The fine art market is still very strong for works of high quality, and this sale will offer an array of high quality works by both European and American artists,” said Gene Shannon of Shannon’s Fine Art Auctioneers.

Franz Richard Unterberger painting

Oil on canvas by Franz Richard Unterberger (Austrian, 1838-1902), titled “Canal in Venice” (estimate $150,000-$250,000).

The expected top lot is an original oil on canvas by Austrian painter Franz Richard Unterberger (1838-1902), titled “Canal in Venice.” A masterpiece measuring 31 1/4 inches by 47 inches, the painting is estimated at $150,000 to $250,000. Unterberger is best known for his scenic paintings of Italy, both intimate views and large vistas.

A painting by Arthur Wesley Dow (Am., 1857-1922), titled “The Glory of Shiva, Shiva Temple, Grand Canyon,” carries an estimate of $50,000 to $75,000. The oil on canvas, which is 24 inches by 18 inches, is signed, titled and dated (1912). This is one of only a few known works by Dow of the Grand Canyon.

A rare view of Lake Champlain, which is bordered by Vermont and New York, by the classical Hudson River School artist David Johnson (Am., 1827-1908), titled “Split Rock, Lake Champlain,” is estimated at $25,000 to $35,000. The 12-inch by 20-inch oil on canvas is monogrammed lower left, signed and dated (1871).

Dale Nichols painting

This oil on canvas by Dale Nichols (Am., 1904-1995), titled “Farm in Winter” carries an estimate of $20,000 to $30,000.

A panting by Dale Nichols (Am., 1904-1995), titled “Farm in Winter” and measuring 20 inches by 25 inches, carries an estimate of $20,000 to $30,000. The work is signed, dated (March 9, 1948) and inscribed “For Sarah Day.” Renowned for his Midwestern scenes and depictions of American life, Dale Nichols is often viewed as the “Fourth Regionalist” after Grant Wood, Thomas Hart Benton and John Steuart Curry.

An oil on canvas by Luigi Lucioni (Am., 1900-1988), titled “The Leaning Silo,” signed and dated 1939, is estimated at $15,000 to $25,000, The 17-inch by 24-inch work is a masterful composition with compelling light and symmetry. Lucioni became one of America’s premier landscape painters in the 1930s and ’40s, known for his heightened realism and attention to detail.

R. C. Gorman bronze

Sculptural bronze by R. C. Gorman (Am., 1932-2005), titled Navajo Code Talker (estimate $8,000-$12,000).

American artist Alex Katz (b. 1927) is represented by “Tiger Lilies,” estimated at $10,000 to $15,000. The 16-inch by 15 1/2-inch painting is signed lower left and dated 1965. This painting is a study for a painting of the same name and date that sold for $106,000 in 2008.

Four works by American artist Thomas Michael (T.M.) Nicholas (b. 1963) will cross the block. One is an original oil on canvas titled “Three Masted Schooner, Sunset” ($12,000-$18,000). The 30-inch by 40-inch view, possibly of Rockport Harbor, is signed lower left. Nicholas, an artist from the Cape Ann School, captures New England by using magnificent colors and rich textures.

Sculpture will include a bronze titled “Navajo Code Talker,” by R.C. Gorman (Am., 1932-2005). The 16-inch tall rendering, one of only 10 made, is of the artist’s father, Carl N. Gorman, a Navajo Code Talker and one of a group of revered Native Americans who served in World War II. A monumental casting of this sculpture is located in Flagstaff, Ariz.

To learn more, visit about Shannon’s Fine Art Auctioneers.

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