What’s hot in this year’s antique glassware market is a matter of taste

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Like most collectible areas, the glass market is slowly recovering from tough market conditions. Prices of smalls were off 20 to 40 percent because of the recession. Like the real estate market, glass experienced a bubble of unrealistically high prices. In this excerpt we look at which segments of glass collecting show strength and why the market is less regionalized than it was before the crash.
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Ancient Egyptian necklaces and other fine antiques to be auctioned online on Proxibid

An auction Aug. 13, 2011 includes three breathtaking pieces of antiquity that were displayed in the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Egyptian Jewel Room for more than 25 years. Two necklaces dating back to the Armana Period 1130 B.C., were crafted during the New Kingdom, which was a time when art and design was at its height. Colors were vibrant, which can be seen in the reds, yellow and greens used in the glazed composition pendants on two of the three necklaces up for auction. The third necklace is a beautiful example of an amulet necklace with the female protector, Bastet.

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More than 500 rare and vintage clocks and assorted memorabilia offered with no reserve

An antique discovery clock auction, Aug. 27, 2011 is loaded with more than 500 rare and vintage clocks from a single-owner collection. Included in the sale are American large wall clocks and case clocks, grandfather clocks and examples from England, France and Germany. This more than just a clock action. Tucked inside the sale are pendulums, weights, watchmakers’ benches and multi-drawer cabinets, watch and clock ephemera and advertising signs.
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Estate jewelry, original artwork and fine porcelain offered in Florida action

Hundreds of quality lots of fine porcelain, original artwork and estate jewelry will cross the block in a multi-estate sale planned for Saturday, Aug. 27, 2011 by Elite Decorative Arts. One lot is expected to bring $80,000-$100,000 or more. It is a pair of large bronze and ivory Continental figures, one depicting a warrior wearing a crown with a sword to the hip and the other depicting a warrior wearing a bearskin headdress and scaled armor. The figures, each one 18 inches in height on a 3 ¼ inch round wooden base, were made circa 18th or 19th century. Read More +

Fostoria glass rarities show up at 12th annual Elegant & Depression Glass Show in Nashville

Dealers at the 12th Annual Elegant and Depression Glass Show packed the Tennessee State Fairgrounds with elegant and depression glass, July 16-17, 2011 including some rare pieces. Two of the rarer pieces at the show included a Fostoria American soap dish and a Cambridge glass owl lamp. The Fostoria soap dish was complete with lid and was priced at $3,500. The owl lamp was priced at $2,100.
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ASK AT: Vintage View-Master, cash register worth more for play than money

Antique Trader shows one reader that his attic find of a vintage View-Master and Junior Merchant tin bank, while colorful and interesting, have more value as display items than big-ticket collectibles. View-Masters have been in continuous production since 1939, when Sawyer’s of Portland, Ore., first introduced the View-Master at the New York World’s Fair. The earliest viewers (known as the Model A viewer) are marked "PAT.APPLD.FOR"; they are made from lightweight Kodak Tenite plastic and are prone to warping.
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Glasshouse Whimsies: Non-production creations are as unique as the artists themselves

Glasshouse whimsies – whether they are entirely free-form or created from production glass pieces – are items made by glassworkers to show off their skills. Whimsies, often given the misnomers "end-of-day" or "lunch-hour" pieces, are known as "friggers" in England. They are non-production pieces; other than the use of factory glass, the whimsies have no connection to the glass factory.
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