Vintage San Francisco rock concert posters remain a unique American art form

We Wilson rock concert poster

San Francisco in the ’60s brings thoughts of hippies and psychedelic rock, but the counterculture manifested itself in all the arts. Some of the rare 45 R.P.M. recordings from San Francisco bands have become valuable, but for collectors of the era’s artifacts, the greatest prizes are often original copies of the posters that promoted concerts in the Bay Area’s ballrooms and clubs. The best of those posters are magnificent examples of 20th century art and design and collectors are paying premium prices to own a slice of this era of American pop culture. Read More +

Former FBI agent turned author Robert Wittman’s first-ever art crime seminar a ‘hit’ with attendees

Former FBI agent and author Robert Wittman’s first-ever seminar June 13, 2011 on how the art business can protect itself against the growing threat of art crime attracted 13 attendees, including Antique Trader columnist Caroline Ashleigh. The week, consisting of five days of instruction and discussion with field experts, was a one-of-a-kind seminar in which each participant personally interacted with the material and presenters. The result was a seminar described by participants as unmatched in quality of topics, expert presentations, and atmosphere.
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Marc Chagall’s love affair with Paris

The Paris discovered by Marc Chagall (1887-1985) when he arrived by train in 1910 was still the city of the art world’s dreams. It was a metropolis of broad boulevards and crooked cobbled alleys lined with ateliers and cafes where Picasso might be found sitting with Braque. Chagall was able to subsist in a city where credit was extended to artists as a matter of course, where meals could sometimes be paid for in sketches and intellectuals could occupy a corner table for an entire afternoon of animated discussion for the price of a cup of coffee.
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Art Markets: Depicting industry in art defined the 20th century modernity

For the first half of the 20th century, images of industry were synonymous with progress. As assembly lines increasingly supplied the needs and wants of the world’s growing urban population, factory scenes became shorthand for the brave new world of modernity. Industrial art became an international genre, crossing political borders and economic systems alike. The scenes of laborers working within the shadows of enormous machines assumed similar form whether in the Soviet Union, Nazi Germany or the United States.
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