Weekly Antiques Auction Ads: Aug. 9-23, 2011

Each week AntiqueTrader.com features all half-page and full page advertisements from the most recent edition of the print magazine, extending our commitment to help our customers find new customers. In this space you’ll see fresh updates to the latest advertisements featuring direct links to the advertisers’ websites. Click on the thumbnail to view or download the entire advertisement!
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Western Pennsylvania’s Scalp Level Art School paintings earning national recognition

A September 2011 sale offers a rare glimpse at the work of a group of painters strongly tied to Western Pennsylvania. Like the Hudson River School, the Scalp Level School was a loosely knit group of artists who trekked into the woods to capture the fading beauty of America’s countryside. Iinstead of leaving New York City to paint scenic views of the Hudson River Valley or the Catskills, they left the smoky streets of Pittsburgh to paint sweeping landscapes near Johnston, Pa., and beyond.
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1914 Albert Marque masterpiece doll sells for $168,000

Sculpted by the renowned French artist Albert Marque (1872-1939), an extremely rare 1914 portrait doll originally commissioned for the Paris boutique Margaine-Lacroix sold to rousing applause for $168,000 (inclusive of 12 percent buyer’s premium) at Frasher’s July 9 auction. The buyer, who beat out four phone bidders and additional on-site bidders at the KCI-Expo Center in Kansas City, was new to Frasher’s client roster.
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Why don’t antiques dealers just cut prices and move old merch? Because we don’t like losing something once we own it

Wayne Jordan looks at the true cost of holding on to inventory too long and why it’s very common in the antiques trade: "Even when faced with compelling financial data (like inventory turns and profits) dealers still hold on to their beloved inventory. The essence of loss aversion is that simply owning something increases its value (to us). We don’t like losing something once we own it. Antiques dealers are also collectors, and they tend to get attached to the items the buy" Read More +

Estate sale holding Shirley Temple glassware, Matchbox cars, Tonka toys and more to be carried live online July 30, 2011

Specialists of the South come July 30, 2011 is overseeing the massive collectibles estate sale of John and Jean Robertson, collectors who amassed a staggering number of items in a wide array of categories over the course of their rich lifetime together. Offered will be soda collectibles, advertising signs and clocks, radio tubes, vintage table radios, a gumball machine, vintage fans and hats, Shirley Temple memorabilia, Matchbox cars, Tonka toys, cigar boxes, American Fostoria, composite roosters, elegant etched glassware and china, children’s books, Rhine wine (Hock) glasses, Hummel figures, Haviland china and Christmas decorations.
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Memorabilia belonging to 1930s vocal jazz harmonists The Boswell Sisters crossing the block

Born in New Orleans, Louisiana, the three Boswell sisters, Martha, Connee, and Helvetia (aka "Vet") became headliners with famous jazz bands of the 1930s. They were acclaimed throughout the United States and overseas. They recorded with Victor, Okeh, Brunswick, and Decca Records. An auction Aug. 4 will feature items from the Boswells’ clothing and jewelry to broadsides, posters, glossy photos, and original records. The sale also includes furniture and paintings, several of which were painted and signed by Connee Boswell herself.
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West German Pottery: Collectors find something for every budget in art born during the Cold War

Despite an increase in availability, West German pottery remains primarily an Internet collectible. This presents difficulties for collectors who are curious, having heard terms such as “fat lava” and perhaps a few company names. Expert Forrest Poston offers an overview of the market and tips new collectors should mind when starting a collection.
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Pablo Picasso donation earns millions for University of Sydney

An important and rarely-seen masterpiece by Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) sold at Christie’s June 21 for $21.8 million. Having resided in just two private collections since it was painted,  "Jeune fille endormie," 1935, was given to the University of Sydney by an anonymous donor on condition that it would be sold and that the university would dedicate the proceeds to scientific research.
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