Guide to collecting carnival glass, America’s iridescent glassware

Fenton carnival glass bowl

The term “carnival glass” has evolved through the years as glass collectors have responded to the idea that much of this beautiful glassware was made as giveaway glass at local carnivals and fairs. However, more of it was made and sold through the same channels as pattern glass and Depression glass. Some patterns were indeed giveaways, and others were used as advertising premiums or souvenirs. This article offers a list of major carnival glass makers and popular forms. Read More +

Fenton art glass prototypes in private hands

Fenton glass basket

An April 21 auction curated by Fenton Art Glass Company staff sets records and bids farewell as the company moves toward the final stages of closing for good. The “star” of the sale was surely lot 52, the super rare Karnak Red 14 inches tall offhand Egyptian vase with hand applied Hanging Hearts and random threading and applied cobalt blue short stem and foot. Rarities such as this are seldom available in today’s marketplace, so it was no surprise when spirited bidding took place, and the vase finally sold for $11,000. Read More +

What’s hot in this year’s antique glassware market is a matter of taste

Depression-Glass-Cambridge-cup-and-saucer.jpg

Like most collectible areas, the glass market is slowly recovering from tough market conditions. Prices of smalls were off 20 to 40 percent because of the recession. Like the real estate market, glass experienced a bubble of unrealistically high prices. In this excerpt we look at which segments of glass collecting show strength and why the market is less regionalized than it was before the crash.
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Fostoria glass rarities show up at 12th annual Elegant & Depression Glass Show in Nashville

Dealers at the 12th Annual Elegant and Depression Glass Show packed the Tennessee State Fairgrounds with elegant and depression glass, July 16-17, 2011 including some rare pieces. Two of the rarer pieces at the show included a Fostoria American soap dish and a Cambridge glass owl lamp. The Fostoria soap dish was complete with lid and was priced at $3,500. The owl lamp was priced at $2,100.
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Glasshouse Whimsies: Non-production creations are as unique as the artists themselves

Glasshouse whimsies – whether they are entirely free-form or created from production glass pieces – are items made by glassworkers to show off their skills. Whimsies, often given the misnomers "end-of-day" or "lunch-hour" pieces, are known as "friggers" in England. They are non-production pieces; other than the use of factory glass, the whimsies have no connection to the glass factory.
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Antique glass clubs prepare as Mega Glass Convention stands to make history

Man has been producing glass since about 3500 B.C., and it’s been held in high regard in America since Colonial times. Now, more than 400 years after glass was first produced at the Jamestown settlement in Virginia, collectors will gather in America’s heartland to celebrate this glorious substance in one place. The first Mega Glass Convention will be held July 7-9, 2011 at the Marriott Overland Park Hotel.
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