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While this has been another unusual year for dealers, according to Asheford Institute of Antiques, there were still plenty of changing trends to be found in the antiques and collectibles field in the results of its 2021 survey, even as many of 2020’s top-selling themes remained strong.

Stainless steel was finally toppled by brass, while an old indestructible kitchen favorite from the 1960s and 1970s got hot. Art Deco sellers continued to reap the profits from their trend-setting insights, while vintage dealers who added textiles to their inventory made out like bandits.

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The survey was conducted from January 2021 to December 2021 by the research staff at Asheford. The survey consisted of a sampling of more than 2,231 current students and past graduates that are actively employed or working within the antiques, collectibles and vintage marketplaces within the United States and Canada (both urban and rural areas). All those who participated in the survey operate their own antiques and vintage, or estate sale/appraisal businesses (including online concerns), and are listed as, “proprietors” in the survey.

Results give a picture of what categories moved up or down on the school’s decorative arts charts in 2021, and only dealers and sellers who remained open for at least eight months of the twelve-month period were invited to participate.

The focus of the survey was directed toward interest in current market trends within the antiques, vintage and collectibles community, based on sales and requests for particular items, genre and periods from customers and clients. The survey was informal in nature and therefore did not employ any standardized or measurable scientific practices or criteria in obtaining results.

Survey results were categorized by the age groups of the proprietors, indicating item/genre/period-specific preferences most popular to each of these groupings.

The item/genre/period listings, and their relative popularity with consumers, were represented by a potential numerical scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the most popular and 10 being the least popular.

While the survey did not include specific geographic comparables, the terms North East (NE), South East (SE), North West (NW), and South West (SW), were used where applicable to indicate particularly strong interest in item/genre/periods. Listings without these abbreviated notations indicate positive interest in “all” geographic locations.

Note: Asheford said the term “Victorian” included in the results is not inclusive of Art Deco, Art Nouveau, and Mission styles in this survey.

Here are the results of the 2021 survey, broken down into age groups of antiques and vintage business proprietors:

Art Deco is the No. 1 trend in the 20 to 40 age group. Pair of Art Deco club chairs, c. 1930, stained mahogany, mixed wood inlay, mohair; $4,375.

Art Deco is the No. 1 trend in the 20 to 40 age group. Pair of Art Deco club chairs, c. 1930, stained mahogany, mixed wood inlay, mohair; $4,375.

Ages 20 to 40

1. Art Deco

No surprise here as dealers from this age group virtually all reported incredibly strong sales for literally anything Art Deco (AD), or anything that even slightly mimicked the AD style. While much of last year’s winners in this category were located in the “smalls” column (clocks, ashtrays, table lamps, objets d’art, etc.), most dealers today are reporting their strongest sales coming from furniture and case items. Poll respondents indicated that since people had once again returned to in-store shopping, the demand for larger pieces also increased. Dressers, beds, sofas and cabinets of every stripe from the era were all snapped-up quickly, according to many of the dealer’s survey reports. (NE) (NW) (SW) 

2. Textiles

Strong, strong sales from all areas. The pandemic’s effect has seemingly only strengthened the popularity of this area of collectibles as young dealers — especially women — have reported extremely robust sales within this category over two consecutive years. For those who have added even a mild textile accent to their overall inventory (think vintage handbags and scarves), the results have been impressive. Jackets, formal wear, sneakers, and jeans may be the mainstay of this group, but dealers are branching out into virtually every nook and cranny within this category from vintage macrame wall-hangings to funky flower-power quilts from the ’60s. (NE) (NW) (SW) ​

3. Mid-Century Modern

While many so-called industry experts have been predicting the demise in popularity of this category over the last few years, most mid-century dealers would beg to differ. MCM continues to show broad appeal to a wide range of buyers, with an emphasis on young urbanites. However, dealers noted that during the pandemic, buying was more heavily weighted toward “smalls” and carry-home items rather than larger pieces of furniture. With most restrictions on in-person shopping no longer in effect, many dealers say their stockpiles of Danish credenzas and Eames-style lounge chairs are being quickly depleted. Lesser-known designers such as Pierre Paulin, with his wide range of orange-slice and potato-chip-styled chairs, and Sven Ivar Dysthe’s commercial wood and fabric pieces, are all in high demand and continue to draw strong interest and prices from the public. (NE) (NW) (SW)

4. “Space” Collectibles

While many dealers felt that space memorabilia would have dropped off the radar after NASA’s recent moon landing commemoration, it appears that nothing could be further from the truth. Apparently, you can thank Elon Musk, China, the US, and a host of other nations who’ve been popping spacecraft, telescopes and rovers into orbit, one after another, for the public’s continuing interest in this collectible field. Dealers are reporting strong sales numbers for memorabilia items related to actual spacefaring, not just those associated with science fiction shows, although those numbers are impressive as well. Real-world collectibles include Space Shuttle Christmas tree ornaments, Apollo flight plan books, Space X and Apollo “Rocket” lamps, and virtually anything related to NASA from the early years. Toys from shows like Star Wars, Star Trek, and Netflix’s rebooted Lost In Space series from the 1960s, are also seeing hefty sales spikes in all areas of related merchandise, including toy spaceships, movie posters, and even gaming-related items.

CorningWare kitchenware is coming in hot with collectors in the 20-40 age group and prices are reflecting that. This never-used vintage CorningWare cassoulet and lid with the Cornflower Blue pattern sold on eBay in January for $8,000.

CorningWare kitchenware is coming in hot with collectors in the 20-40 age group and prices are reflecting that. This never-used vintage CorningWare cassoulet and lid with the Cornflower Blue pattern sold on eBay in January for $8,000.

5. Kitchen & Barware

While this category is technically new to the list this season, it shouldn’t be. For a number of years now, collectors have been quietly snapping up bits and pieces of kitchen and barware from various styles and periods — especially the more modern ones. However, it’s not just the cool atomic or sunburst decorated tumblers from the mid-century that have collectors intrigued, but also the more mundane cookware sets from the 1960s, like CorningWare’s, Cornflower Blue plates and dishes, that some dealers are reporting as selling for well into the thousands of dollars. Many of the younger buyers in this category say sales jumped during COVID and have never really gone back, though many also acknowledge a dwindling lack of inventory as second-hand stores and garage sales are increasingly coming up short as reliable resupply options. (NE) (NW)

​6. Costume Jewelry

Continuing to hold its popular positioning from previous years, costume jewelry remains a favorite with not only consumers at entry-level shops and malls but also with major auction houses, which have held a number of large sales over the past year featuring some of the best pieces from the twentieth century. From online vintage stores to dedicated antiques shops, costume jewelry (particularly of the vintage variety) has remained in consistently high demand throughout the pandemic. Shop owners continue to indicate that keeping a sufficient amount of quality stock on hand can be a challenge considering the current market popularity. Top designers such as Ashbee, J.W. Benson, Spratling and Bugari are all market favorites, with matching prices to complement their works.

7. Lighting

While virtually all areas of lighting remained popular in 2021, from the Victorian era right through to the 1980s, custom-made lights in the industrial and Steampunk motif have continued to fare particularly well with dealers in major urban centers, along with show-dealers (and those on Etsy.com), who also reported strong sales across the board on these unique hand-made pieces. Seventies-style tube lights and white plastic space-age chandeliers also seemed to gain favor from a number of urban dealers, while the mainstay of chrome and stainless steel from the 1930s through to the early ’70s continued its overall dominance of the antique and vintage markets. New to the scene this year was an upswing in requests for copper lighting pieces, which many dealers believe is a knock-on effect from the latest design movements in copper and brass motifs currently influencing today’s kitchens. (NE) (NW) (SW)

8. The 1970s

A stellar performer over the last few years, this generation of modular plastic furniture, shag rugs and space-age themed objects d’art, continues to hold court in the Southwest and Northwest, with dealers in California noting strong sales in just about every area of this decorative arts category. Lucite furniture, white plastic chairs, hanging chairs, rattan furniture and mirrored tables are all staples of the period, and according to west coast dealers, are also bestsellers, providing condition is top-notch. (SW) (NW)

Board games are particularly in demand with the 20-40 age group, including Chutes and Ladders, Risk and Ouija boards. Victorian folk art 19th century Ouija board with matching planchette. Made around the turn of the century, stamped pattern on old corner cut plywood; $750.

Board games are particularly in demand with the 20-40 age group, including Chutes and Ladders, Risk and Ouija boards. Victorian folk art 19th century Ouija board with matching planchette. Made around the turn of the century, stamped pattern on old corner cut plywood; $750.

9. Toys

Toy cars, like real cars, have seen a boom in collectible interest as well as price during the pandemic. Just as prices have risen for full-size collectible automobiles, they’ve also gone up for miniature versions as well. With plenty of people still working remotely from home over the last twelve months, the opportunity to snap up some deals online hasn’t been lost to toy collectors. Prices have climbed for many childhood favorites — but particularly in demand have been vintage board games, such as Chutes and Ladders, Monopoly, Backgammon, Ouija, Risk, and virtually anything from Milton Bradley. Classics, such as wind-up toys, tin trains, along with diecast cap guns and cars are all making the grade, with steep increases in valuations for even modest examples. New to the list for this year, dare we say it ... yes, a return to Beanie Babies — at least according to some dealers.

10. Early Americana and Canadiana

It wasn’t that long ago this category couldn’t be found on any top-ten list, much less that of dealers who identified as forty and under, but what a difference a few years can make. With people out on the hunt again — visiting antiques stores and shows — some dealers are reporting brisk sales when it comes to harvest-style dining rooms and coffee tables. Granted, many say they’re selling primitive repos, but dealers indicate that most people don’t care and simply like the look and warmth of the wood. As was the case last year, blending rustic with modern was the focus of most customer requests. Leading the charge were blanket boxes, smaller hutches, narrow two-board harvest tables, simple metal farm implements, small condo-friendly chests-of-drawers, and rustic workboxes with simple stenciling. Interest was strong across most regions, but particularly in the Northeast. (NE) (SW) (NW)

Ages 40 to 60

1. Textiles

Perhaps nowhere in the field of decorative arts has there been such sustained upward growth in a particular category of collecting — especially one that allows the buyer/collector the opportunity to not only admire their purchase but to wear it as well. The growth of vintage online textile dealers on sites such as Etsy, The RealReal, Tradesy, and Poshmark has almost single-handedly launched a niche industry of textile sellers. While initially dealers tended to be younger, they have matured over time, and today online sales of vintage clothing have taken off in virtually every demographic and age category. Seasoned dealers abound, with classic offerings from such designers as Chanel, Halston, Missoni and Gaultier. Demand has risen dramatically in the last few years, and many dealers today say pricing is at a premium, both in terms of customers as well as inventory. Denim to couture is the order of the day, with vintage shops of this kind being particularly prevalent in the Northeast and Northwest.

Textiles is the No. 1 trend in the 40 to 60 age group, including vintage clothing by Chanel, Halston and Missoni. This Halston red one-shoulder cocktail dress, c. 1970s, has an iconic draped silhouette with cascading sleeve, $450.

Textiles is the No. 1 trend in the 40 to 60 age group, including vintage clothing by Chanel, Halston and Missoni. This Halston red one-shoulder cocktail dress, c. 1970s, has an iconic draped silhouette with cascading sleeve, $450.

​2. Period Jewelry

Only a few short years ago costume jewelry was all the rage, and while it’s still very popular, period gems and stones have made a remarkable comeback, at least according to a number of dealers in the trade. Most notably, auction houses in the Far East have set the tone, with auction prices escalating well beyond anticipated values. Dealers in North America have also indicated that prices have been rising steadily, with a shortfall in available stock from estate and garage sales looming. Most popular amongst buyers are Art Deco and Victorian pieces with some later Mid-Century examples from Van Cleef & Arpels. Tiffany, Cartier, Bailey-Banks & Biddle, lead the Art Deco break-out, but lesser-known designers from the late Victorian period are also gaining popularity, especially for their large brooches and matching bracelets. (NE) (SW) (NW)

3. Mid-Century Modern

As mentioned, MCM has defied many expert predictions regarding its premature demise. Dealers within the 40 to 60 age category, while somewhat late to the MCM game, have made up ground in recent years, and now account for the largest demographic group of dealers and retailers related to this space. Like their younger brethren, these dealers have also noticed marked increases in interest and sales for larger furniture pieces when compared to items from last year. Darker teak pieces (such as desks, tables and cabinets), being especially popular as they blend well with bold colors like yellow, red, and orange. Again, dealers report that growth is mainly limited to large urban areas with suitable architecture to compliment the MCM motif.

4. Antique & Vintage Watches

While the sudden uptick in the popularity of classic wristwear may have come about as a result of the pandemic and people staying indoors (in front of their computers), its continued rise in collector and dealer circles certainly hasn’t abated now that walk-ins to businesses are part of life again. Dealers are continuing to report that men’s high-end vintage watch sales are soaring in value despite a recent glut of “used” merchandise on online markets due to escalating prices. Premiums for Seiko Professionals from the 1970s, Gallet Chronographs from the 1940s and 60s, Rolex Submariners, and Omega Speedmasters from the 80s, are now standard fare on many websites. Dealers have indicated that while sales are brisk, finding legitimate inventory can be challenging as fakes and semi-fakes (cobbled together examples) are rife within the chronographic community. (SW) (NE) (SE)

5. Costume Jewelry

As noted, costume jewelry remains well-liked by many dealers from this age group. As a collectible, it was admired and highly valued well before the pandemic, with its popularity continuing to rise, even today. A perennial favorite with the general public, dealers report that sourcing out inventory is becoming increasingly difficult now as savvy garage salers and estate sale liquidators are scooping up much of the available stock for resale online. Examples from known designers like Stanley Hagler, Catamore, D’Orlan, and Giovanni have escalated well beyond the range of the average buyer, with dealers expecting market prices to climb higher as interest flourishes, and stock diminishes.

Ephemera is the sixth-top trend with ages 40 to 60, including Clint Eastwood movie posters, like this one for A Fistful of Dollars/For a Few Dollars More (United Artists, R-1969). Folded, Very Fine-, one sheet (27" x 41"); $252.

Ephemera is the sixth-top trend with ages 40 to 60, including Clint Eastwood movie posters, like this one for A Fistful of Dollars/For a Few Dollars More (United Artists, R-1969). Folded, Very Fine-, one sheet (27" x 41"); $252.

6. Ephemera

Maybe it’s because of the world’s move to a digital format, or perhaps it’s just pent-up demand resulting from COVID restrictions, but either way, the call for paper collectibles has been on a steady rise over the last few years. At least according to a number of print and paper dealers who say that items such as travel brochures, posters, maps, ticket stubs, and even menus from famous cruise and airlines, like B.O.A.C and White Star, have all seen dramatic price increases recently. Movie and music posters from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, especially with generational stars in them (think Clint Eastwood and Phil Collins), have also been on the rise with collectors. Vintage paper board games like Parker Brothers’ Sorry and 1950s Milton Bradley’s Forest Friends, have all seen steep increases in valuations as well. (NE) (NW) (SE)

7. Victorian

While it may not seem like it at first glance, aside from textiles, no other traditional category has made such a dramatic move up the decorative arts charts over the past few years than items from the Victorian era, whether it’s early, mid or late. Antiques show dealers, East coast pickers, and “brown” furniture specialists continue to report that cash-poor millennials and youngsters from Generation Z are the demographic groups responsible for snapping up cheaply priced Victorian pieces as an alternative to flat-pack furniture offerings from places like Ikea. While the price may have been the original motivating factor for most of these sales, many dealers also acknowledged seeing a lot of “return” customers coming to buy secondary pieces because they wanted to, not because they had to. Practical items from chairs to tables and benches, to chests of drawers took top billing, but dealers also noted that quirky Victorian pieces and decorative items were also starting to sell as well. (NE) (SE) (NW)

Period jewelry, including Victorian pieces, is popular with the 40-60 age group. Victorian turquoise and pearl brooch with an openwork scrolling design, $435.

Period jewelry, including Victorian pieces, is popular with the 40-60 age group. Victorian turquoise and pearl brooch with an openwork scrolling design, $435.

8. Paintings/Sculptures

Prices for mid-century paintings and wall art continued to remain strong according to many gallery dealers. While Victorian watercolors and oils also moved upward, the majority of dealers said that MCM pieces were by far and away the most viewed and requested on their websites. Prices and interest in mid-twentieth-century artists like George Jay Rogers, Thomas Brownell Eldred and Paul Sheppard (all MCM painters), set new highs for the year at many of the galleries. Dealers report that while supply remains tight on better-known artists, lesser-known examples are plentiful. (NE) (NW) (SW)

9. Automobilia/Petrolina

With gear and petrol-heads limited to purchases on the Internet during the height of the pandemic and stay-at-home restrictions, prices for automobilia and petrolina items soared to unheard-of levels. Now, with lockdowns eased, prices have finally dropped back to more realistic levels. Dealers who got caught in the pinch say that while they may have overpaid for a few items a couple of months back, they’re still in good shape because of the purchases they made before the pandemic broke out. Prices are now steady, according to most dealers, who say they expect numbers to begin climbing again (albeit more slowly), once fully out of the pandemic. Traditional favorites like auto posters, metal signs, oil cans, decals and emblems, chrome grills, etc. continue to be the bread and butter of most dealers' sales.

10. Glass

It may be hard to fathom, but it appears that “glass” may have finally moved out of the collecting doldrums. For years it seemed that regardless of the type of glass, this category simply languished in a type of sales and pricing purgatory that left dealers with little to be enthused about. However, the public’s recent interest in general bar and kitchenware seems to have had a spillover effect, with many dealers reporting an upswing in interest related to most fields of glass collecting. Art glass continues to be popular with buyers just about everywhere, as do MCM examples related to cocktail sets. The resurgent interest in milk glass also remains on track with prices steadily increasing year over year. Supply for all types, except MCM, is plentiful in most areas. (NE) (NW) (SE)

*Note: Art Deco came tied for tenth place along with glass in this dealer category, although most dealers acknowledged that this was likely due more to a lack of available AD inventory rather than anything else.

The top trend with ages 40 to 60 is Mid-Century Mod furniture. Florence Knoll Modern oval table desk #2480, designed by Florence Knoll Bassett in 1961 and manufactured 1970s, consisting of an oval, highly figured rosewood top and a chrome finished steel pedestal base; $1,000.

The top trend for ages 40 to 60 is Mid-Century Mod furniture. Florence Knoll Modern oval table desk #2480, designed by Florence Knoll Bassett in 1961 and manufactured 1970s, consists of an oval, highly figured rosewood top and a chrome-finished steel pedestal base; $1,000.

Ages 60 to 80

1. Mid-Century Modern

As reported last year, older dealers have slowly but surely been building stock into the MCM category. A rise of almost eight spots up the charts over the last five years is indicative of how positive many dealers in this age group feel about its staying power. While many acknowledge that sales are heavily influenced by geographic and architectural considerations, they also note that even in less urbanized areas, the popularity of the style is still very strong. Dealers from the Midwest have reported particularly good sales in some regions where one would not normally expect them. As price points for dealers have risen steadily over the last few years, sourcing affordable stock from even mainstream manufacturers like Knoll, Widdicomb Furniture, Stilnovo Lighting, and Paul McCobb, has become increasingly difficult. Most dealers expect prices will continue to rise as there seems little indication of abatement anytime soon related to a lack of interest in this decorative arts stalwart. (NE) (NW) (SW)

2. ​Art Deco

Up one spot from last year, AD now seems poised to remain in the upper category rankings for some time. Many dealers say that even though pandemic restrictions have eased the supply crunch somewhat, as garage, auction, and estate sales are all back up and running, there still seems to be a general overall shortage of decent inventory coming onto the market. For many, it’s becoming eerily reminiscent of the MCM scenario, with hefty prices being charged for middling examples. While last year the emphasis was on smalls and jewelry, this past year dealers say the hottest AD items leaving the showroom floor tended to be furniture pieces. Although sales for smaller top-shelf items from Cartier, Tiffany and Caldwell have continued to post impressive auction results. Demand is currently greater than supply, according to many dealers, so expect prices to climb. (NE) (NW) (SW)

3. Vintage Outdoor Furniture

Many older dealers say they saw the writing on the wall when COVID originally hit, and began investing in vintage outdoor furniture, anticipating the need for greater space outside and flexibility as people worked from home. However, recent sales results, say many of the dealers, continue to be strong despite the return to the office for many. Vintage and Mid-century pieces — think cantilevered garden chairs inspired by the famous Willem Hendrik Gispen, or the return of round Victorian black cast-iron garden chairs, have all been selling out. While reproductions are numerous (and cheap), dealers say customers are still willing to pay premiums for original vintage and antique examples in tip-top shape. Other items that are reportedly selling well include refurbished wicker living/sofa sets, all types of Mid-century patio furniture, folding rope chairs, iron-frame butterfly chairs, metal framed garden chairs, and simple hoop-chairs. In most cases, demand continues to outstrip the available supply. (NE) (NW) (SW)

Art Nouveau has moved up the charts in the age 60-80 group.  A Bohemian Art Nouveau metal-mounted glass vase, Pallme-König, circa 1900-1905; $593.

Art Nouveau has moved up the charts in the age 60-80 group. A Bohemian Art Nouveau metal-mounted glass vase, Pallme-König, circa 1900-1905; $593.

4. Georgian (Style) Furniture

While sales of Georgian furniture have slowly been ticking up recently, the past two years have been especially good for those in the industry. For many dealers, it appears the curse of “brown wood” may have finally lifted, with high-end buyers returning to the showroom floor as auction results bear witness to the rising prices. While still nowhere near the heyday values from the early 90s, collectors and dealers are nevertheless encouraged by the relatively strong numbers that have appeared on multiple sales platforms over the past twelve months. Despite the uptick though, supplies remain tight as old-time sellers seem reluctant to part with their prized collections until prices return to twentieth-century levels. (NE) (SE)

5. Victorian Furniture

As mentioned previously, the Victorian era seems to be having something of a mini-renaissance, at least with certain demographic groups. Many of the dealers within this category say they had all but given up on selling this old staple of the antique business years ago, but changes in buying habits recently from younger generations has brought them back into the fold. While prices are still depressed overall, certain styles from within the era, along with particular pieces, such as marble-topped washstands and side tables, are not only selling well but are back to commanding almost full price. Supplies remain plentiful and dealers are hopeful that interest will once again spread back over to a broader cross-section of the population. (NE) (NW) (SW)

6. Chinese Antiques

Despite strained relations with the West, there does not appear to be any loss of appetite by the public when it comes to acquiring legitimate examples of antiques from the Far East. Prices have risen steadily over the last year, and dealers across the board seem to be reporting fairly robust sales figures. However, most are continuing to warn customers and others in the industry of the ongoing battle when it comes to fakes, and the difficulties involved in obtaining authentic inventory. However, while Jade may reign supreme, there were some signs of weakness last year as top-tier pieces failed to reach their reserves at auctions in Hong Kong. On a more pedestrian level, traditional furniture, vases, robes, and silk paintings continued to post solid gains according to many long-established dealers in the field. (SW) (NW) (NE)

7. Lighting

For many long-haul dealers, offering lighting from different eras and periods has often been seen as a staple of inventory when it comes to running an antiques business. Proving this adage true, a number of dealers are now reporting that buyers have recently been snapping up quality lighting examples from virtually every style under the decorative arts umbrella. Of particular note, anything Art Deco, including lamps, sconces and chandeliers. MCM examples are also in high demand, especially when it comes to desk lamps. While Victorian pieces are not quite up to par in the pricing division yet, they are nevertheless showing strong sales results, with leaded glass shades, pendant lights, and brass floor lamps leading the way. Scarcity can be an issue with AD and MCM when it comes to restocking, however dealers are reporting solid supply lines for quality Victorian examples.

8. Victorian Paintings

Last year we noted that many senior dealers from this age bracket had witnessed a revival in interest related to Victorian paintings. Since that time, other dealers have also climbed on board, expressing a similar sentiment, as sales of Victorian oils and watercolors have steadily moved back into the “profitability” range over the last couple of years. Sporting country scenes, portraits, and landscapes have all increased in price, with stock remaining plentiful for decent examples of mid-level artists. Demand for top-tier painters from this era has once again resumed an upward trajectory. (NE) (NW) (SE)

9. Art Nouveau

Seasoned dealers are continuing to experience renewed interest in the Art Nouveau style, with many attributing its growth in popularity to its timely connection to the rise of Art Deco. Online sales for smalls and other objects d’art have grown dramatically according to many dealers in urban areas, as corollary interest by buyers of mid-century modern pieces seems to have sparked a return to more sinuous lines for some collectors. Art Nouveau items tend to blend easily with the mid-century format, making them especially desirable to younger urbanites. Dealers continue to note a shortage of good available stock and a subsequent rise in asking prices from pickers and other online dealers. (NE) (SW) (NW)

Silver also made a comeback in 2021 with the 60-80 age group, including flatware. These are several pieces from a 47-piece lot of American sterling silver flatware by various makers, 19th-20th centuries; $1,500.

Silver also made a comeback in 2021 with the 60-80 age group, including flatware. These are several pieces from a 47-piece lot of American sterling silver flatware by various makers, 19th-20th centuries; $1,500.

10. Silver

As a category, most dealers will probably tell you that silver has been punished by the markets more than any other collectible in recent memory. However, according to some dealers in the Northeast, there might just be a glimmer of hope on the horizon. While most in the industry reported slow to sluggish sales prior to the pandemic, it appears that hanging-at-home may have reignited the public’s interest for all things silver (or at least, “some things silver”). Flatware, Halloware, and silver belt buckles all saw solid climbs in pricing during the height of the pandemic and have managed to maintain that momentum even today. Many dealers caution that the upswing may simply be a blip, but others are more optimistic, and have begun stocking up on the relatively cheap collectible as a hedge against
rising values in the future. (NE)

To learn more about the antiques and appraisal study program being offered by the Asheford Institute, call 877-444-4508, email info@asheford.com, or visit www.asheford.com.

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