DALLAS - A rare silver spoon made by America's most famous silversmith, Paul Revere, Jr., is now the most expensive spoon in the world after selling at Heritage Auctions for a record $32,500.

The table spoon, circa 1790, and monogrammed HH at the terminal end for Hepzibah (Hall) Fitch, was part of a stunning collection of well-provenanced silver made by Revere, which sold for a combined $336,250, well above expectations.

This Paul Revere, Jr. silver spoon, Boston, circa 1790, now holds the world auction record, after selling for $32,500.

This Paul Revere, Jr. silver spoon, Boston, circa 1790, now holds the world auction record, after selling for $32,500.

Adrenaline remained high throughout Heritage Auctions’ recent eight-hour Fine Silver & Objects of Vertu Auction, as one great collection followed the last. Interest was staggering, selling 99 percent by volume, and the value incredible, with the auction flying past its high estimate to reach $2,433,894.

The auction’s top lot was a tankard also made by the historically renowned silversmith. Made circa 1790 and standing 10 inches high, the Revere, Jr., silver tankard sold at $112,500. Coming in a close second to the spoon was a 15-3/8-inch-long silver ladle, made by Revere in Boston circa 1880, which sold for $31,250.

The top lot of the sale was this tankard by Paul Revere, Jr., Boston, circa 1790, that sold for $112,500. The 10" x 8" tankard has a tapered body, horizontal mid-band, and C-scroll handle with scrolled openwork thumb piece to baluster drop below three-knuckle hinge, later pineapple-form finial on domed cover.

The top lot of the sale was this tankard by Paul Revere, Jr., Boston, circa 1790, that sold for $112,500. The 10" x 8" tankard has a tapered body, horizontal mid-band, and C-scroll handle with scrolled openwork thumb piece to baluster drop below three-knuckle hinge, later pineapple-form finial on domed cover.

The Revere collection included the largest number of his pieces ever sold in a single auction, said Karen Rigdon, director of Silver and Fine and Decorative Arts at Heritage. “It was extremely exciting to bring this collection to auction and watch it perform so well,” she said.

American Aesthetic Movement silver also fared well, with spirited bidding for a large Tiffany & Co. Lap-Over-Edge Pattern service selling all in for $57,875. A rare Gorham ice bucket, festooned with icicles and set on an iceberg and offered together with its identically monogrammed original spoon, received much attention, selling for $23,750.

A selection of strong Neoclassical forms with imposing bodies on lion’s feet by Paul Storr continue to have a great following, selling for a combined $147,437. The group’s top lot was a Storr Regency tea urn from a Dallas collection of English silver. The piece, made in London circa 1815, sold for $38,750. A stunning tureen from the collection sold at $24,375 and a coveted pair of covered sauce tureens turned heads at $18,750.

A special collection of gold boxes from the collection of David Mehler prompted a frenzy of interest and brought a combined $141,125. The collection’s top lot was a French vari-color 18k gold snuff box, which sold for $30,000.

Demand for late 20th-century objects created in the manner of Fabergé continues to grow among collectors due to its exceptional craftsmanship, such as the Revolving Egg-Form Clock, which sold for $42,500.

There is growing collector demand for late 20th-century objects created in the manner of Fabergé, such as this 14k vari-color gold, guilloché enamel, and diamond-mounted revolving egg-form clock with key, 11" x 3-1/8" x 3-1/8" that sold for $42,500.

There is growing collector demand for late 20th-century objects created in the manner of Fabergé, such as this 14k vari-color gold, guilloché enamel, and diamond-mounted revolving egg-form clock with key, 11" x 3-1/8" x 3-1/8" that sold for $42,500.

A wide range of early works by Georg Jensen, and later iconic modernist designs which included jewelry, were highlights of the collection of Dr. James Young. The collection’s star was a Georg Jensen No. 337 Covered Bowl and Underplate that sold for $47,500, which far exceeds all other recent results. Unsurprisingly, a monumental Louvre Cistern sold for $40,000, and a pair of No. 725B wine coolers ended at $25,000. The strongest result among the Jensen jewelry offering was for the No. 115 Sycamore Pod necklace in 18k gold at $12,187.

This dramatic, five-piece Japanese dragon-form coffee service, 20th century, sold for $37,500, against an $8,000 estimate. Originally retailed by Kamiwaza, Japan, the service includes a coffee pot, a teapot, a bachelor's teapot, a creamer and a waste bowl.

This dramatic, five-piece Japanese dragon-form coffee service, 20th century, sold for $37,500, against an $8,000 estimate. Originally retailed by Kamiwaza, Japan, the service includes a coffee pot, a teapot, a bachelor's teapot, a creamer and a waste bowl.

Additional highlights from the auction include a William Spratling punch bowl that sold for $16,250; a dramatic, five-piece Japanese dragon-form coffee service that sold for $37,500 against an $8,000 estimate; and a massive floor vase by Graziella Laffi, who continues to see growing interest, that sold for $15,000.

For more results, visit Heritage Auctions.