Macy’s Parade a holiday tradition

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 A helium-filled Turkey on it’s way through Times Square in 1959, accompanied by a marching band. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

A helium-filled Turkey on it’s way through Times Square in 1959, accompanied by a marching band. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

Part of the cultural landscape since 1924, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York has become as traditional a part of the holiday as turkey and stuffing. This year’s parade will kick off at 9 a.m. on Nov. 28, with more than 3.5 million people expected to attend.

Here are some highlights of the nearly 100-year history of what has become one of America’s most beloved parades, now with more than three million New Yorkers watching along the route and around an additional 50 million television viewers.

 Looking a gift turkey in the eye, Jimmy Durante “noses” up to the gobbler presented to him in preparation for his role as Grand Marshal of the annual Macy Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1950. Jimmy took good care of the bird to make certain it could make the long march down Broadway with an impressive array of floats and floating giants. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

Looking a gift turkey in the eye, Jimmy Durante “noses” up to the gobbler presented to him in preparation for his role as Grand Marshal of the annual Macy Thanksgiving Day Parade in 1950. Jimmy took good care of the bird to make certain it could make the long march down Broadway with an impressive array of floats and floating giants. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

1924-27: The “Macy’s Christmas Parade” (it didn’t become the “Thanksgiving Day Parade” until 1927) made its debut and marked the welcoming of Santa Claus to the city. The parade featured marching elephants, monkeys, camels, bears and other animals borrowed from the Central Park Zoo. Live animals stopped being used in the parade after 1926 and were replaced by the balloons we know today, starting with an inflatable Felix the Cat in 1927, along with a toy soldier and dragon.

1929: The balloons used to be released intentionally post-parade, with specific valves introduced in 1929 so they could float for days before landing. A monetary reward and gifts were given to those who returned the deflated balloons to Macy’s. According to TIME magazine, this tradition stopped in 1932 after a balloon interfered with a passing plane, causing it to tailspin.

1934: The first Mickey Mouse balloon made its debut. Three more Mickeys appeared in 1977, 2000, and 2009. Also debuting in 1934 was the first balloon based on a real person: performer Eddie Cantor.

1942-1944: There were no parades these years due to rubber and helium shortages caused by World War II, and the balloons that had been made were given to the government so the spare rubber could be used for war efforts.

1946: The parade was broadcast on local TV for the first time (it also had a record crowd of 2 million people), followed by national coverage in 1947. Two other big things also happened that year: the parade’s original route, which spanned roughly six miles, was cut down to less than half that distance; and parts of the classic film Miracle on 34th Street were shot during the parade. The crowd had no idea the Santa Claus that year was played by Edmund Gwenn from the film.

1957: Popeye made his debut during rainy weather, which was bad news for parade viewers and the balloons. The top of Popeye’s hat filled with rainwater, which caused him to swerve into the spectators and dump it all over them.

1958: Due to another national helium shortage, the balloons were filled with regular air and hung from construction cranes.

 A teddy bear flies high and looks down on the crowd in 1949. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

A teddy bear flies high and looks down on the crowd in 1949. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

1968: Snoopy made his parade debut and there have been seven versions of his balloons — the most of any character in the parade’s history — from Astronaut Snoopy to Millennial Snoopy.

1977: Kermit the Frog debuted, and appeared again in 2002.

1980: The massive character balloons are also built in New Jersey, where designers have been experimenting with materials over time. Cotton fabric was originally used, then neoprene (similar to a tire’s inner tube). Each portion of any given balloon is designed as a separate chamber, so if a balloon is pierced in the face by something, the rest of its body will remain filled with helium.

1985: Not all floats are a success. Betty Boop made her debut in the 1985 parade, but her tenure didn’t last long, ending just two years later with sporadic appearances through the 1990s.

2014: Six new giant balloons debuted, the most in a single year, including Paddington Bear.

2018: Temperatures only hit 19 degrees on Thanksgiving morning, making it the second-coldest Thanksgiving on record, but the parade marched on.

 A 63-foot helium balloon of Underdog, a television cartoon favorite for millions of kids, follows a turkey float down Broadway in 1979. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

A 63-foot helium balloon of Underdog, a television cartoon favorite for millions of kids, follows a turkey float down Broadway in 1979. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

 The crowd watching the 1956 parade behind a police barricade, with children watching in the front. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

The crowd watching the 1956 parade behind a police barricade, with children watching in the front. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

 A giant Bullwinkle float looms over the crowd in the 1962 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Despite the weather, a large crowd came out to see the parade on a rainy Thanksgiving Day. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

A giant Bullwinkle float looms over the crowd in the 1962 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Despite the weather, a large crowd came out to see the parade on a rainy Thanksgiving Day. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor/Getty

 It wouldn’t be a parade without some high-kicking ladies. This group was in the 1961 parade. A number of tableaux behind commemorate landmarks in the city’s history. Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images

It wouldn’t be a parade without some high-kicking ladies. This group was in the 1961 parade. A number of tableaux behind commemorate landmarks in the city’s history. Photo by Archive Photos/Getty Images

 Bonanza star Lorne Greene (1915-1987) and the incomparable Betty White are photobombed by a giant float as they pose for a publicity still at the parade in 1969. The pair presented the telecast of the event for NBC television and hosted the parade every year from 1962 to 1971. Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

Bonanza star Lorne Greene (1915-1987) and the incomparable Betty White are photobombed by a giant float as they pose for a publicity still at the parade in 1969. The pair presented the telecast of the event for NBC television and hosted the parade every year from 1962 to 1971. Photo by Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

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