Appraisals: Lucite lamp could have $800 value

Susan Mullikin, co-owner of Mother-Daughter Vintage, evaluates a Mid-Century Lucite lamp and a vintage pickle jar for Antique Trader subscribers.
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Appraisals by Susan Mullikin

Appraisal: Vintage pickle jar

Vintage pickle jar with bail handle

Vintage pickle jar with bail handle

I was hoping that maybe you could help me find any kind of information on this old glass jug that has the number one on the bottom and letters I-74. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

— J.B.

One can learn much from actually examining an older bottle. In this case we are examining an older glass jug for markings on the bottom indicating important signatures of manufacturers, or on the side giving a clue as to the advertising of the contents once contained. In your case no markings are found on either the side of the glass jug or the top of the metal lid.

I first thought the number on the bottom indicated Owens Manufacturing Glass Company was responsible for your jug; but research this proves to not be the case. The shape of your circle surrounding the number one is different than the circle indicating Owens to be the manufacturer.

bottom of vintage pickle jar

bottom of vintage pickle jar

In a large percentage of bottles marked with only a number on the base it becomes difficult – if not impossible – to assign a specific glass manufacturer to a bottle if their is no other information embossed in the glass. In a majority of cases, single digit numbers refer to mold numbers, merely serving to identify a particular mold that was used to form the bottle. In your case I-74 may refer to the mold number.

Numbers also serve other purposes, some refer to the year/date as well as inventory, catalog, style, or design numbers. Though we can not pinpoint the exact manufacturer of your glass jug, by shape alone and research we can identify your glass jug as an old pickles canister from the 1950s by its screw on metal lid and wire handle with wooden carrying handle.

I would value your pickles canister at $20-$30.

Appraisal: Lucite lamp

Vintage Lucite lamp

Vintage Lucite lamp

Q Attached is a photo of a lamp that I purchased about 20 years ago. I would like to know who the artist is that made it. I tried to research, however I was unsuccessful. The signed signature appears to be ‘Frigber.’ It’s a very tall Lucite lamp.

Thank you.

— H.S.

“Lucite” the main component of your lamp submitted for inquiry regarding the possible identification of the artist who signed the base is a versatile material used today in interiors just as it was in 1937 when commercially available. Lucite is actually a brand name for a kind of acrylic resin developed in the 1930s by DuPont, basically the same as Plexiglas.

Mark on Lucite lamp

Mark on Lucite lamp

You have a very impressive lamp emulating the Mid-Century style. You mention you purchased your Lucite lamp with chrome fittings about 20 years ago, roughly 1998. You did not mention at that time if you purchased your lamp new. (In 2002 there was a Lucite renaissance.)

Or possibly you bought it used from perhaps an antique store. Famous designers of the 1960s included Karl Springer, Valdimir Kagan, Charles Hollis Jones, and Gaetano Sciolari and they were certainly not the only designers of that era. I believe that the designer who designed your lamp remains anonymous upon research. I would have your lamp appraised in your area for a concrete value. From the photo alone though I would place a value of $900 plus on your lamp due to its construction of Lucite.

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