Donley Auctions gears up for Fall Classic

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 This triple-arch bar, manufactured by The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co. of New York and Chicago, circa 1900, is one of the featured lots at Donley Auctions Fall Classic Nov. 14-16. The beautiful oak and leaded glass-lit ensemble, 30’ x 12’, would be the centerpiece of any business or home party room. Estimated value is $40,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Donley Auctions

This triple-arch bar, manufactured by The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co. of New York and Chicago, circa 1900, is one of the featured lots at Donley Auctions Fall Classic Nov. 14-16. The beautiful oak and leaded glass-lit ensemble, 30’ x 12’, would be the centerpiece of any business or home party room. Estimated value is $40,000-$50,000. Image courtesy of Donley Auctions

UNION, IL. — Antique coin-ops, slot machines, advertising, petroliana, cars and much more will be among the 1,000 lots of quality antiques featured at November’s Fall Classic at Donley Auctions.

Some of the highlights include a rare and magnificently preserved circa 1898 Mills Double Dewey slot machine with a pre-sale estimate of $60,000-$79,000; a beautiful circa 1900 oak and leaded glass-lit Brunswick triple arch saloon bar and backbar with a pre-sale estimate of $40,000-$50,000; a coin-operated rocket kiddie ride with a pre-sale estimate of $20,000-$30,000; a circa 1920s Fry Visible “Mae West”-style gasoline pump with a pre-sale estimate of $4,000-$6,000; and a 1943 World War II Jeep designed by the American Bantam Car Co. with a pre-sale estimate of $15,000-$20,000.

The schedule is as follows:

Thursday, Nov. 14: a preview from noon to 8 pm, and a preview party from 5-8 pm.

Friday, Nov. 15, 4 pm: Coin-op, advertising, bars architecture items will go up for bid.

Saturday, Nov. 16, 2 pm: Petroliana items, signs and cars will be auctioned.

The auction is live and there is also online bidding via Proxibid.com, AuctionZip.com and Invaluable.com. For more information, visit DonleyAuctions.com.

 During the late 1940s-1950s, science fiction and the dream of future space travel was all the rage and coin-operated kiddie rids were everywhere. Rocket rides are the most highly prized and sought-after of all these kiddie rides. This Red Rocket ride has an estimate of $20,000-$30,000.

During the late 1940s-1950s, science fiction and the dream of future space travel was all the rage and coin-operated kiddie rids were everywhere. Rocket rides are the most highly prized and sought-after of all these kiddie rides. This Red Rocket ride has an estimate of $20,000-$30,000.

 This rare and magnificently preserved Mills Double Dewey slot machine was manufactured by The Mills Novelty Co. of Chicago, circa 1898. This early upright slot machine is the forerunner of all the tabletop machines that followed and made Chicago the “Slot Machine Capitol of the World.” One side operates with nickels, while its twin takes quarters only; a rather hefty fee for the early 1900s; estimate: $60,000-$70,000

This rare and magnificently preserved Mills Double Dewey slot machine was manufactured by The Mills Novelty Co. of Chicago, circa 1898. This early upright slot machine is the forerunner of all the tabletop machines that followed and made Chicago the “Slot Machine Capitol of the World.” One side operates with nickels, while its twin takes quarters only; a rather hefty fee for the early 1900s; estimate: $60,000-$70,000

 A beautiful “Butter-Kist” popcorn machine with peanut roaster was manufactured by Holcomb & Hoke of Indianapolis, IN, circa 1916. This machine allowed a person to become an instant businessman. It originally sold for $12,000, which is over $28,000 today; estimate: $8,000-$10,000.

A beautiful “Butter-Kist” popcorn machine with peanut roaster was manufactured by Holcomb & Hoke of Indianapolis, IN, circa 1916. This machine allowed a person to become an instant businessman. It originally sold for $12,000, which is over $28,000 today; estimate: $8,000-$10,000.

 Wooten DeskWooton’s patent cabinet office secretary, the “King of Desks,” manufactured by the Wooton Desk Company, Indianapolis, IN, circa 1876, is touted to have “one hundred and ten compartments under one lock and key.” These massive desks resembling a piece of fine furniture became a late19th century status symbol. It features swing-out wings that reveal a complete office and filing system. Ulysses S. Grant used one in the White House; estimate: $6,000-$8,000.

Wooten DeskWooton’s patent cabinet office secretary, the “King of Desks,” manufactured by the Wooton Desk Company, Indianapolis, IN, circa 1876, is touted to have “one hundred and ten compartments under one lock and key.” These massive desks resembling a piece of fine furniture became a late19th century status symbol. It features swing-out wings that reveal a complete office and filing system. Ulysses S. Grant used one in the White House; estimate: $6,000-$8,000.

 Beginning in the 17th century, it became less practical to carry or push the dead by hand, so horse-drawn hearses came into fashion and stayed a long time - 300 years! These elaborate and ornate “carriages for the dead” were used to transport the casket during a funeral procession; estimate: $8,000-$10,000.

Beginning in the 17th century, it became less practical to carry or push the dead by hand, so horse-drawn hearses came into fashion and stayed a long time - 300 years! These elaborate and ornate “carriages for the dead” were used to transport the casket during a funeral procession; estimate: $8,000-$10,000.

 Originally designed by the American Bantam Car Co. of Butler, PA, in 1940, this Ford Motor Company-built vehicle was born out of the Army’s need for a vehicle that could replace both the horse and the motorcycle. It was designated “GP” for general purpose, which was pronounced “Jeep” by the service men who drove them. Over 350,000 were produced by Ford and Willys during the war; estimate: $15,000-$20,000.

Originally designed by the American Bantam Car Co. of Butler, PA, in 1940, this Ford Motor Company-built vehicle was born out of the Army’s need for a vehicle that could replace both the horse and the motorcycle. It was designated “GP” for general purpose, which was pronounced “Jeep” by the service men who drove them. Over 350,000 were produced by Ford and Willys during the war; estimate: $15,000-$20,000.

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