Gene London was a storyteller – first as the beloved host of a long-running children’s-TV show in Philadelphia, then as curator of an astonishing collection of big-screen costumes worn by glamorous Golden Age idols. 

Among those whose dresses filled London’s shining assemblage: Marilyn Monroe, Grace Kelly, Cyd Charisse, Joan Crawford. And on and on it went, a roll call as long as the guest list to party at Frank Sinatra’s Farralone home; each one a star who only grows bigger as the screens get smaller.

London, born Eugene Yulish and who died in January 2020 at the age of 88, amassed a 60,000-piece collection of iconic outfits worn by iconic stars.

Gene London in 2018 with a costume worn by Charlton Heston in "Ben Hur" that was displayed, along with several other pieces, as part of Reading Public Library's "Cocktails and Classics Fundraiser."

Gene London in 2018 with a costume worn by Charlton Heston in "Ben Hur" that was displayed, along with several other pieces, as part of Reading Public Library's "Cocktails and Classics Fundraiser."

“To Gene, the fabric told a story,” says John Thomas, London’s husband and partner for nearly four decades. “A piece of clothing is made for three minutes on the screen or whatever, but it’s custom-made for that person, that actor, for that moment. It’s part of the performance. Those costumes told stories. And Gene loved sharing them.”

Now that task has fallen to Thomas, who is sharing select pieces from the renowned, museum-exhibited Gene London Collection in Heritage Auctions’ July 16-18 Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction, the most all-star event in the Dallas-based auction house’s history.

Among the dresses to be sold this summer are three worn by Marilyn Monroe: the Travilla polka-dot dress she wore in Billy Wilder’s 1955 Seven Year Itch, when Monroe’s The Girl first meets Richard Sherman’s Tom Ewell; Elsie’s signature pearl-encrusted mermaid gown from 1957’s The Prince and the Showgirl; and the ensemble she wore as Cherie in 1956’s Bus Stop, her first film after studying at the Actors Studio.

The Bus Stop costume is such a piece of Hollywood iconography London loaned it to Madonna, who can be seen wearing it in a Steven Meisel photo that accompanied the March 1991 Vanity Fair cover story, “The Misfit,” so named for Monroe’s final film. (Speaking of, this sale also features Jean Louis’ sketch of Monroe’s dress from The Misfits, along with a sketch of her gown from the “Happy Birthday, Mr. President” moment.) Madonna also wore The Bus Stop ensemble on the poster advertising the 1991 documentary, Truth or Dare.

Marilyn Monroe "Cherie" ensemble from "Bus Stop" (TCF, 1956). Vintage original two-piece signature ensemble including black lace over olive green mesh peasant-style top with elasticized boat neckline with static string tie, puffed princess sleeves with elasticized cuffs and a black silk satin wrap-around sheath skirt. Opening bid: $150,000.

Marilyn Monroe "Cherie" ensemble from "Bus Stop" (TCF, 1956). Vintage original two-piece signature ensemble including black lace over olive green mesh peasant-style top with elasticized boat neckline with static string tie, puffed princess sleeves with elasticized cuffs and a black silk satin wrap-around sheath skirt. Opening bid: $150,000.

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A still shot of Monroe wearing the ensemble in the movie.

A still shot of Monroe wearing the ensemble in the movie.

“Gene was a storyteller, and Marilyn figured into a lot of those stories,” Thomas says. “She was the ultimate gold-standard movie star: born in Hollywood to a hard-scrabble life, a self-made woman. She was vulnerable and a sexual revolutionary; she took us from that puritanical moment in the 1950s and blew it out of the water. And when she did Bus Stop she had a new contract and a new attitude. She said, ‘I will choose my own director, my own material.’ Gene used these dresses to tell her story.”

The Travilla polka dot "meet-cute" dress Monroe wears in "The Seven Year Itch"(TCF, 1955). Vintage original silk halter top dress, and as with most Monroe wardrobe pieces, this costume was created with a series of strategically placed weights sewn to aid the gown in molding around her famous curves, and was worn when the Girl (Monroe) first meets Richard (Tom Ewell) after he'd buzzed her into their building. The costume has been modified for a subsequent production and dyed lavender. Opening bid: $150,000.

The Travilla polka dot "meet-cute" dress Monroe wears in "The Seven Year Itch"(TCF, 1955). Vintage original silk halter top dress, and as with most Monroe wardrobe pieces, this costume was created with a series of strategically placed weights sewn to aid the gown in molding around her famous curves, and was worn when the Girl (Monroe) first meets Richard (Tom Ewell) after he'd buzzed her into their building. The costume has been modified for a subsequent production and dyed lavender. Opening bid: $150,000.

A movie still of Monroe in the dress.

A movie still of Monroe in the dress.

Monroe, too, tells it herself here: Among London’s most prized pieces is a letter Monroe wrote to her acting coach Michael Chekhov, whom she called “the most brilliant man I have ever known” in her posthumously published, half-finished autobiography My Life. She vexed Chekhov, often running late for lessons or skipping them entirely, though she revered him and believed him the man capable of making the world see her as the serious actor she had become.

Monroe’s pieces are accompanied in this event by other iconic garments from London’s collection, among them Joan Crawford’s blue-and-white short-sleeve gingham dress she wore as the title character in 1945’s film noir Mildred Pierce, 25 years ago added to the United States Library of Congress National Film Registry. Crawford held a special place in London’s heart: They met on the set of The Gene London Show, and Crawford was the first actor to gift him a dress by request, which she had dispatched in a Palmolive box.

Joan Crawford signature Mildred Pierce costume from the movie "Mildred Pierce" (Warner Bros., 1945). Vintage original blue and white short-sleeve gingham dress with V-neckline, wide white linen pointed collar and cuffs, one hip pouch pocket, self-belt, darted bodice with unique bias-cut snap front closure and additional side zipper closure. Opening bid: $40,000.

Joan Crawford signature Mildred Pierce costume from the movie "Mildred Pierce" (Warner Bros., 1945). Vintage original blue and white short-sleeve gingham dress with V-neckline, wide white linen pointed collar and cuffs, one hip pouch pocket, self-belt, darted bodice with unique bias-cut snap front closure and additional side zipper closure. Opening bid: $40,000.

A still from the movie of Crawford wearing the costume.

A still from the movie of Crawford wearing the costume.

“He was very funny, very irreverent,” Thomas says. “He had a charm about him. He was a wonderful guy, a truly loving man, and Crawford fell in love with him in a way. They talked on the phone all the time.”

From that relationship sprang his love affair with Golden Age Hollywood costumers. He began attending auctions and meeting different collectors – and, quite simply, “that’s how the collection grew,” Thomas says.

It was inevitable that his collection would also include clothing worn by Philadelphia royalty: Grace Kelly.

Also being offered in this auction is the vintage floor-length ivory-silk gown Kelly wore as Princess Alexandra" in 1956’s MGM production The Swan. The savvy studio held its release until April 18, 1956 – the very day Kelly married Prince Rainier of Monaco in a Helen Rose-designed gown that looked exactly like the one Kelly had worn in The Swan at the new Princess of Monaco’s request.

Grace Kelly "Princess Alexandra" gown from "The Swan" (MGM, 1956). Stunning vintage original ivory silk organza V-neck, floor-length gown featuring crème silk embroidered floral designs alongside floral appliques, lace inset modesty panel at neck, sheer cap sleeves, ruched cummerbund style waist panels, faux seed pearl embellishments, under layer of crème silk adorned with ornate lace applique hem. Kelly loved the dress so much that she had costume designer Helen Rose copy it for her wedding to Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, in April 1956. Opening bid: $60,000.

Grace Kelly "Princess Alexandra" gown from "The Swan" (MGM, 1956). Stunning vintage original ivory silk organza V-neck, floor-length gown featuring crème silk embroidered floral designs alongside floral appliques, lace inset modesty panel at neck, sheer cap sleeves, ruched cummerbund style waist panels, faux seed pearl embellishments, under layer of crème silk adorned with ornate lace applique hem. Kelly loved the dress so much that she had costume designer Helen Rose copy it for her wedding to Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, in April 1956. Opening bid: $60,000.

A movie still of Kelly as Princess Alexandra wearing the gown at the Royal Ball.

A movie still of Kelly as Princess Alexandra wearing the gown at the Royal Ball.

Also being sold is the Christian Dior couture coat Kelly wore in the Oscar-nominated 1977 documentary The Children of Theatre Street, about the Vaganova Academy of Russian Ballet.

Here, too, is one of the most iconic garments of the Golden Age from a film that defines it as much as anything committed to celluloid: Cyd Charisse’s crème silk ballet leotard, with the 40-foot chiffon train, worn during the Broadway Melody ballet in 1952’s Singin’ in the Rain. It’s the defining sequence in a film full of magical moments, where Gene Kelly’s Don Lockwood figures it all out – in a dreamland dance that resonates today as it did 60 years ago.

Cyd Charisse "dancer" costume from "Singin' in the Rain" (MGM, 1952). Vintage original crème silk ballet leotard with chiffon overlay, a spray of silver sequins, tank straps, silk chiffon under layer, accompanied by an approximate 40-foot long flowing chiffon train. In the dreamlike Broadway Rhythm Ballet, Charisse makes a stunning entrance trailing this endless chiffon train, streaming as if choreographed by a mischievous breeze. An unforgettable costume from one of Kelly's most epic pieces of choreography in a most beloved and iconic American movie musical. Opening bid: $30,000.

Cyd Charisse "dancer" costume from "Singin' in the Rain" (MGM, 1952). Vintage original crème silk ballet leotard with chiffon overlay, a spray of silver sequins, tank straps, silk chiffon under layer, accompanied by an approximate 40-foot long flowing chiffon train. In the dreamlike Broadway Rhythm Ballet, Charisse makes a stunning entrance trailing this endless chiffon train, streaming as if choreographed by a mischievous breeze. An unforgettable costume from one of Kelly's most epic pieces of choreography in a most beloved and iconic American movie musical. Opening bid: $30,000.

Cyd Charisse and Gene Kelly in "Dancin' in the Rain.".

Cyd Charisse and Gene Kelly in "Dancin' in the Rain.".

Thomas is parting with these pieces because it’s time, simple as that – time to let someone else find the joy in them that Gene London did, time for someone else to share their stories.

“And we don’t really own these,” Thomas says. “How do you own something as ethereal as this. We don’t own it. We share them We pass them on. We do our best while we have them as caretakers. The films are our lasting legacy. That’s what we have to share. Nothing lasts forever. But these are part of special moments, and that’s what makes them worth acquiring.”

More lots being offered from London's collection can be seen here

For more information about the auction and to see more entertainment lots being offered, visit Heritage Auctions.

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