Florida’s J-5 Ranch Barn Sale welcomes visitors April 13

The J-5 Ranch Barn Sale is returning to Okeechobee, Florida, on Saturday, April 13, at J-5 Ranch, located at 10406 Bluefield Road.
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OKEECHOBEE, Fla. — The J-5 Ranch Barn Sale is returning to Okeechobee, Florida, on Saturday, April 13, at J-5 Ranch, located at 10406 Bluefield Road.

The popular event, which brought in more than 1,200 guests in May 2018 and again in October, is expecting over 2,000 shoppers in April. The sale opens at 8 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m.

The J-5 Ranch Barn Sale is returning to Okeechobee on Saturday, April 13, 2019.

The J-5 Ranch Barn Sale is returning to Okeechobee on Saturday, April 13, 2019.

The 5,400 square foot barn and surrounding pasture will be full of vendors from Florida and Georgia specializing in vintage, handmade, repurposed, antique, shabby, primitive, and farmhouse-style items and furniture. Breakfast and lunch vendors will also be present at the sale.

The sale, created by Jayne (Johnson) Platts and her mother Kathy Johnson, stemmed from their mutual love of antiques and decorating.

“After attending events for years all over the United States, we decided locals needed their own antique extravaganza,” Johnson said. “We never imagined our idea would grow into this, and we are forever grateful.”

J-5 Ranch is a working cattle ranch and venue. Visit www.j5ranch.wordpress.com for more information about the ranch, the upcoming barn sale, and to view the vendor list and layout. Find J-5 Ranch on Facebook at www.facebook.com/j5ranchevents/ and follow on Instagram @j5ranchbarn.

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